19/11/2018: Parents struggle to handle children’s tech habits

Parents worry about how excessive mobile use is affecting their children but struggle to tame their tech habits, suggests a survey. It found that 43% of 7,000 parents across Europe who were surveyed were concerned that using gadgets meant their children slept poorly. Others feared what tablet and phone use did to social skills (38%) and children’s mental health (32%). But many said they set a bad example with their own heavy use of gadgets

Source: BBC

16/11/2018: Online Bullying – Practical Advice for Teachers

Quite often, teachers can be the first to suspect that a child is having a bad time. Children who are being bullied online could become withdrawn, isolating themselves from their peers, or seeming more tired or distracted in class. They could actually behave differently, or become angry or upset more easily. If you suspect someone you are teaching may be being bullied online, here is some advice from the Professionals Online Safety Helpline.

Source: South West Grid for Learning

15/11/2018: MiSafes’ child-tracking smartwatches are ‘easy to hack’

A location-tracking smartwatch worn by thousands of children has proven relatively easy to hack. A security researcher found the devices neither encrypted the data they used nor secured each child’s account. As a result, he said, he could track children’s movements, surreptitiously listen in to their activities and make spoof calls to the watches that appeared to be from parents.

Source: BBC

14/11/2018: British children could be issued with ‘digital passports’ to protect them from online porn

Teenagers could be forced to apply for a ‘digital passport’ to prove they are old enough to join social media sites such as Facebook. Digital minister Margot James admitted yesterday that while plans to impose a strict age verification scheme on pornographic websites has been delayed, the ‘time has come’ for a clampdown on social media sites, because many are flooded with adult material.

Source: Daily Mail

14/11/2018: Gaming Disorder

The World Health Organisation has recently incorporated ‘gaming disorder’ into the International Classification of Diseases, and in the UK those diagnosed will be entitled to treatment from the NHS. This change is in response to an increase in excessive gaming, with various knock-on effects including family breakdown.

Source: South West Grid for Learning

14/11/2018: 16 reasons why we need to speak out about intimate image abuse

From 25th November, the International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women, to 10th December, Human Rights Day, the Revenge Porn Helpline is supporting the 16 Days of Activism Against Gender-Based Violence campaign. 16 Days of Activism is a global awareness campaign to create awareness and start a conversation about gender based violence as a human rights issue.

Source: South West Grid for Learning

13/11/2018: ‘Schools should have consistent policy on phones’

Pupils in schools where smartphones are banned like being free of the associated pressures, says England’s Children’s Commissioner Anne Longfield. Ms Longfield said schools across England should have a consistent approach to the use of mobile phones. She told the Commons Science and Technology Committee that every school seemed to have its own policy on whether pupils could use phones.

Source: BBC

13/11/2018: Bullying: It’s emotional

Turn to the topic of bullying, whether it’s at a conference or a dinner party, and people’s perspectives vary widely; but mostly are drawn from their own experiences. It’s a very personal thing to discuss. Many people can relate to times in their lives when they may have felt isolated; targeted; at the receiving end of something unpleasant.

Source: South West Grid for Learning

13/11/2018: Schools should ‘take the lead’ on curbing pupils’ social media use

Schools should take the lead on teaching children how to cope with the “avalanche” of pressure they face on social media, says England’s children’s commissioner Anne Longfield. Giving evidence before MPs this morning, Ms Longfield cited schools that have banned smartphones or made pupils turn their phones off at 9pm as examples of how teachers can help students to manage social media use.

Source: Times Education Supplement

08/11/2018: Children’s personal online details being collected from birth by social media companies

Vast volumes of personal data are being collected about children from social media, public services and even toys with the potential to have an impact on their futures, according to a new report. The research – called Who Knows What About Me – by the children’s commissioner for England has revealed that individuals’ digital footprints begin forming sometimes even before birth with online posts by parents.

Source: Sky

08/11/2018: Children are being ‘datafied from birth’

The children’s commissioner for England is calling on internet giants and toy-makers to be more transparent about the data they are collecting on children. Today’s children are the first to be “datafied” from birth and little thought has been given to the consequences, a report for her says. Who Knows What about Me? calls for a statutory duty of care between social media giants and their younger users.

Source: BBC

06/11/2018: What is #schoolshaming?

Some commentators believe individual schools should not be criticised in public or on social media and refer to this as “school shaming”. What do they mean and when is it acceptable to complain about a school’s policy on, for example, uniform or behaviour?

Source: Guardian

05/11/2018: Statement: In response to the Home Office announcement on IWF online child sexual abuse imagery data collection

Susie Hargreaves OBE, CEO of the IWF, says: “We are delighted that the Home Office has asked us to provide data to explore how legitimate advertisers are being exploited by offenders, intent on sharing horrific imagery of child sexual abuse online.

Source: Internet Watch Foundation

31/10/2018: IWF response to Home Affairs Select Committee Report

Last Thursday, the Home Affairs Select Committee published a report which echoes previous findings by the Justice Select Committee, namely that Police Forces are not adequately equipped to handle the volume of digital evidence generated, including cases of online child sexual abuse (CSA). The report states: “We are concerned that the police response to CSA is still nowhere near the scale needed, especially given the risk that online CSA may either be an indicator of current or future contact child abuse, or a contributing factor towards an offender engaging in physical abuse in the future.”

Source: Internet Watch Foundation

30/10/2018: Android’s under-5s apps have ‘unfair and deceptive’ ads

Under-fives are being blitzed with app-based ads which are often manipulative, inappropriate or deceptive, according to a coalition of campaign groups.
Examples given include a character crying if the child does not pay to unlock part of a game, and an app promoting another title that showed a cartoon of the US president trying to press a “nukes” button.

Source: BBC

29/10/2018: The latest email scam: sextortion

There’s always some inventive scam trying to con you out of money doing the rounds. And this latest trend is particularly colourful. If something like this has landed in your inbox (like it did in mine just a couple of weeks ago) you probably have lots of burning questions like; what video was I watching? When did spammers start advising their targets to use Google as a preferred search engine? And perhaps the most pressing of all, what nasty things was I doing?

Source: South West Grid for Learning

25/10/2018: Facebook secret software reveals 8.7m child abuse images on its platform

Facebook has said its moderators have removed 8.7m child abuse images in the past three months, as the company battles pressure from regulators and lawmakers worldwide to speed up removal of illicit material. It said on Wednesday that previously undisclosed software automatically flags images that contain both nudity and a child, helping its reviewers. A similar machine learning tool was also revealed that it said caught users engaged in “grooming” of minors for sexual exploitation.

Source: Guardian

24/10/2018: Facebook removes 8.7m child nudity images in three months

Facebook has said that 8.7 million images of child nudity were removed by its moderators in just three months. The social network said that it had developed new software to automatically flag possible sexualised images of children. It was put into service last year but has only become public now.

Source: BBC

23/10/2018: UK’s internet guardian ‘sets standard’ for hotlines worldwide

A unique British charity which hunts down and removes online child sexual abuse images and videos, has won praise for outstanding good practice from a top EU assessor for its global work with law enforcement and the internet industry to remove tens of thousands of horrific images each year. The Internet Watch Foundation (IWF) was assessed during a two-day visit to its Cambridge base. The appraisal by INHOPE, a global collaboration of hotlines working against online child abuse, reviewed the charity’s relationship with government, law enforcement and child welfare agencies, together with care for staff, internet security and data management.

Source: Internet Watch Foundation

23/10/2018: Dangers of Online Casting

Actress Abbie Samuel is no stranger to the process of online casting and is warning fellow thespians to make sure adverts are legitimate. The 25 year old from London has teamed up with Fixers and two other actresses to create a film highlighting the dangers of online casting, to promote safety when auditioning.

Source: Fixers

Cyber bullying

What is cyber bullying?

When a bully uses the internet as a tool to abuse someone, this is known as cyber bullying or online bullying.

As a parent, guardian or carer it doesn’t matter if you don’t understand internet technology, you can still help your child if they are being bullied online.

There are lots of places where you can find information online about cyber bullying including the NSPCC website.

Blame the Bully, not the technology

Bullies cause cyber bullying and the internet and technology are tools that they use to help make that happen. Taking away your child’s access to the internet won’t necessarily solve the problem. That said, your child may wish to stop using social networks or other things for a while and all of that will need to be talked about and agreed by you and your child together.

Consider if and how you will respond to the bully

Bullies want a reaction of any kind so we suggest to children and young people that they don’t respond at all to online bullies but to report them and block them instead, and to talk to someone they can trust about it. You may want to respond to the bully. If that’s the case, do this when you have had time to consider what your want to say calmly and carefully.
You may want to explain to the bully that you’re now aware of what’s been going on, have saved the evidence of the bullying and have/or are going to report them to the website or social network they have been using, their school (if they are a child and you know them), their parents (if you know them) or the police if you think what’s happening is serious enough.

Save the evidence

Save the bullying if possible for evidence. This could include saving text messages or keeping a record of what’s been happening online. If the bullying is happening online but you can’t save it due to the system that’s been used you can use something called ‘print screen’ or ‘screen capture’ to copy information into a document and save that separately as evidence. If you’re not sure how to do this you can search for instructions online.

Use Reporting Facilities

Many social networks allow users to ‘report abuse’ and ‘block’ users. As a parent, guardian or carer you may want to encourage your child to find out (if they don’t already know) how they can report someone online so that they feel confident to do it if they need to. It’s also important for children to understand the need to report people for cyber bullying before they ‘block them’ so that action can be taken.

Get your school involved

If you think your child is being bullied online by someone from their school contact the school. Individual schools will have their own policies on bullying / cyber bullying. Whatever the policy if your child is being bullied by someone from their school or someone they don’t know, they may need support of some kind during school hours.

If the bully is from your child’s school that may need some support too so by making a report, you can help. Although each case is different, generally schools should make it very clear what their approach is to bullying (including online bullying).

Keep talking

Any form of bullying can make a child feel alone. Cyber bullying can happen day and night, on school days and weekends. This can be not only upsetting but really tiring. Keep talking with your child to reassure them and let them know that they are not to blame.

When to contact the police

If you think that the level of bullying is serious and that your child is at risk of harm telephone Devon and Cornwall Police on 101 and ask to speak with your local Police Community Support Officer or Youth Intervention Officer. In an emergency always telephone 999.
Like the offline environment there are laws in the UK that apply online. Although each case is different, cyber bullies shouldn’t be surprised to receive a visit from the police if what they have been doing has resulted in a criminal offence. You can find out more about the law at GOV.UK.

Gaming

Many gaming devices now mean that children and young people can play online against people they know and people they don’t know (which can include adults). As well as just playing games together people can also interact in other ways.

It’s important to make sure that games are suitable for their age and that children understand how they can stay safer.

Online gaming things to think about

  • Does my child’s gaming device have parental controls that I can use?
  • Who is my child interacting with? Are they adults or children?
  • If my child is playing games online with strangers, what types of things can we both do to help make that experience safer?
  • What type of language are people using in the games and is it appropriate for my child?
  • Does my child understand the risks of sharing personal information (e.g. name, email address, phone number) when gaming?
  • Does my child know what to do if they are being bullied by another player?
  • Does my child know what to do if another player does something to make them feel uncomfortable or frightened?
  • What type of content is my child viewing?

Online gaming things to talk about

If you don’t play online games you might not be sure how to talk about gaming with your child but there are some things you can ask them like:

  • What type of games do you like most? (for example Action, Fantasy, Adventure, Fighting, Racing etc).
  • Can you choose the type of character you play in the game?
  • What are the characters like?
  • What types of things can you do in the game?
  • What types of people can you meet in the game?
  • What types of things do people like to talk about?
  • If someone is being a bully or making you feel uncomfortable, how can you report them in the game?
  • Can I have a game with you? (Having a go on the game is a pretty good way to learn, you might have fun but you should probably expect to lose!).

How old?

The PEGI system gives age ratings to products to help adults decide if a game is suitable for their child. As well as age ratings, products feature ‘descriptors’ which show why a product has received a certain age rating. For example this might be because it contains violence (including sexual violence), discrimination, depictions of alcohol and drugs, or bad language.

Parental controls (TO BE UPDATED)

What are parental controls?

Parental controls are tools that can be used to filter, control and monitor internet activity. Parental controls are one tool that can be used and having them doesn’t mean that regular chats around online activity shouldn’t take place.

Parental controls won’t protect children from issues like cyber bullying, losing control over pictures/videos that they’ve shared or getting a bad online reputation.

Parental controls can be put on televisions, computers, gaming devices and mobile devices like tablets and phones. If you’re not sure how to use (or if you even have) parental controls, contact your service provider and ask them. Not all parental controls are free of charge so you may want to check that out.

Activating parental controls

Internet Matters.org has produced guides to setting up parental controls across a number of platforms. You can view the Youtube Playlist by clicking below.

We’ve been surfing the web to look at a number of websites for companies that provide internet services and find their ‘parental control’ pages. If you’re with one of the following service providers, please visit their website to find out what service is available to you.

Please note that this list doesn’t include all providers.

Plagiarism

The online environment contains so much information that it can be tempting to ‘borrow’ from it, particularly where homework is concerned.

Plagiarism is the act of taking the work or idea of someone else and passing it off as your own. As well as being just bad form, plagiarism is a form of cheating which can have serious consequences at school, college or university.

What you can do:

  • Encourage your child to ask their teachers if there are any specific websites they recommend viewing for particular pieces of work.
  • Suggest that your child gets into the habit of recording the names and website addresses of sites they have used to help them with their homework.
  • Encourage your child to think about what they have read online and then write their homework in their own words. This doesn’t mean ‘changing a few words around’. Instead they should write from their own perspective, based on their understanding of the issue.
  • Ensure that if your child is using a direct quote or piece of information that they know how to reference it (i.e. record that they are using someone else’s work to help them make a point).

Revenge Porn

Revenge Porn is when personal explicit media is publicly shared online without the consent of the pictured individual. This could include sharing ‘sexting’ images of someone in a social network, or posting images or films to websites without their permission.

The law

People who commit revenge porn in the UK can now face prison sentences under a new measure in the law that bans the distribution of a private sexual image of someone without their consent and with the intent to cause distress. Find out more on the Revenge Porn factsheet created by GOV.UK.

 

Getting help

If someone is over 18 they can contact the Revenge Porn Helpline. Anyone under 18 should contact CEOP. Find out what to do if your child is being approached online about sex.

Safe and legal downloading

There are places online where content like films, music and games can be accessed for free. Not all online content is safe and legal and if something seems too good to be true, it probably is.

As well as possibly breaking copyright law, websites offering content for illegal download may contain viruses, malware or spyware that could damage your devices and put your personal data at risk.

What you can do:

  • Talk with your child and agree safe and legal websites for downloading content.
  • Explain why copyright exists and explore how your child would feel if they spent a lot of time and effort creating something that other people then stole or changed.
  • Install and maintain parental controls.
  • Run regular updates on your anti-virus/security software.

For more information visit the ChildNet website.

Sexting (Youth Produced Sexual Imagery)

What is sexting?

Sexting is the word used to describe the sharing of personal sexual content electronically. The word is a combination of ‘sex’ and ‘texting’.

Why do people sext?

Sexting is usually deliberate (i.e. people choose to do it) and is often when someone takes an intimate or sexually explicit image of themselves and sends it to another person (for example a boyfriend or girlfriend). Although it’s completely natural for young people to want to explore their own sexual identity and their relationships, sexting can be really risky and have very serious consequences.

Sexting and the law

If anyone under the age of 18 is sexting (i.e. sending indecent images of themselves), they’re also breaking the law. You can find out more about sexting and the law on the Think You Know website but in brief it’s a criminal offence to:

  • TAKE an indecent image of someone under the age of 18 (which includes someone taking an image of themselves).
  • MAKE an indecent image of someone under 18 (i.e. copy it or save it to another device).
  • SEND an indecent image of someone 18 to another person.
  • ASK someone under 18 to take an indecent image of themselves.
  • HAVE an indecent image of someone under 18.

As a parent a good thing to remember about the law is that it is there to protect young people from harm and from being exploited and it’s not designed to punish them for making genuine mistakes.

That said, every case is different and is always dealt with based on the circumstances and facts involved.

Talking with your child about sexting

Talking about sex isn’t always easy. Like lots of things though it’s better to talk about a subject beforeanything happens.

Many children and young people don’t fully understand the laws about sexting or some of the consequences.

One way to have the conversation at home is to watch and then talk about Exposed (short film) by the Child Exploitation and Online Protection (CEOP) Centre.

More information about sexting

The Childline website has some great information for children and young people about sexting but it’s a good read for parents too.

There are a number of resources for children and parents on sexting and we would always recommend that people search online and speak with others to find good quality information themselves. We think that these resources are also really helpful:

 

Zipit!

Peer pressure can be powerful stuff so Childnet has also created the Zipit App to help children and young people keep flirty chat on the right track.

Online sexual chat

If someone is making your child feel uncomfortable about sex you can report them to CEOP. This might be someone:

  • chatting online with your child about sex
  • asking your child to do sexual things on a webcam
  • asking your child to send sexual images of themselves
  • trying to get your child to meet up with them offline

If this is happening make a report to CEOP. You can also contact Devon and Cornwall Police on telephone 101 (non emergency calls) or 999 (emergency calls only).

What is CEOP?

CEOP is the Child Exploitation and Online Protection Team within the National Crime Agency. They exist to help children and young people who are being approached online about sex or being sexually abused.

Sexting Guidance for Schools

Click here for further information.

Sexting (Youth Produced Sexual Imagery) - Guidance for Schools

Sexting: Guidance for Schools

But let us not forget that the real harm which sexting causes is to the sender as well as the receiver. The embarrassment, bullying, and fear which is instilled when an intimate photo is in the Cloud forever should not be under-estimated.
Olivia Pickney – National Policing Lead for Children and Young People

The UK Safer Internet Centre has worked together with the UK Council for Child Internet Safety (UKCCIS) to develop new advice for schools and colleges about responding to sexting incidents and safeguarding young people.

 

The following documents provide guidance and practical advice on how to deal with sexting incidents in schools, and when appropriate, how to report to the police.

  • Police action in response to youth produced sexual imagery (‘Sexting’) (PDF)
  • Sexting in schools and colleges: Responding to incidents and safeguarding young people (PDF)
  • Keeping children safe in education: Statutory guidance for schools and colleges (PDF)
  • Searching, screening and confiscation: Advice for headteachers, school staff and governing bodies (PDF)
  • Advice for schools: Responding to & Managing Sexting Incidents (PDF)
    This guidance aims to help schools identify sexting incidents, manage them and escalate appropriately.

     

Sextortion

Sextortion

What to do if you’re a victim of sextortion

If someone threatens to share explicit images of you unless you pay them money:

  1. Dont panic. Contact your local police and internet service provider immedaitely. The police will take your case seriously, will deal with it in confidence and will not judge you for being in this situation.
  2. Don’t communicate further with the criminals. Take screen shots of all your communication. Suspend your Facebook account (but don’t delete it) and use the online reporting process to report the matter to Skype, YouTube etc. to have any video blocked and to set up an alert in case the video resurfaces. Deactivating the Facebook account temporarily rather than shutting it down will mean the data are preserved and will help police to collect evidence. The account can also be reactivated at any time so your online memories are not lost forever. Also, keep an eye on all the accounts which you might have linked in case the criminals try to contact you via one of those.
  3. Don’t pay. Many victims who have paid have continued to get more demands for higher amounts of money. In some cases, even when the demands have been met the offenders will still go on to post the explicit videos. If you have already paid, check to see if the money has been collected. If it has, and if you are able, then make a note of where it was collected from. If it hasn’t, then you can cancel the payment – and the sooner you do that the better.
  4. Preserve evidence. Make a note of all details provided by the offenders, for example; the Skype name (particularly the Skype ID), the Facebook URL; the Western Union or MoneyGram Money Transfer Control Number (MTCN); any photos/videos that were sent, etc. Be aware that the scammer’s Skype name is different to their Skype ID, and it’s the ID details that police will need. To get that, right click on their profile, select ‘View Profile’ and then look for the name shown in blue rather than the one above it in black. It’ll be next to the word ’Skype’ and will have no spaces in it. DO NOT DELETE ANY CORRESPONDENCE.

You can also get help from:

Social Media

Social networks are ways of bringing people together using technology to informally (‘socially’) communicate (‘network’). There are loads of social networks out there and you should be a certain age to use some of them.

Lots of social networks have privacy settings which are tools that you can use to help control who sees the information that you share online. Most social networks also have ‘report abuse’ and ‘block’ tools to help you take control of how others behave towards you.

Any information you share online like photos, videos or comments can stay online for a very long time. When you share something online other people can copy it which means that they then have control of it. This means that even if you delete something you’ve shared, someone else might have it.

Reporting and blocking

If you’re using social networks find out how you can report and block people. If someone is doing or saying something that you don’t like or if they’re making you feel scared or uncomfortable, it’s up to you what you do depending on how you feel, but you can report them online, save the evidence, block them and tell an adult you trust.

Remember that you can choose your online and offline friends. If you don’t want to be friends with someone online anymore, remove them from your social networks.

Online friends

Offline the world is filled with a whole range of people some of them nice, some of them mean, some of them just plain dangerous. Online it’s just the same so it’s smart to be careful when choosing your online friends.

Keeping secrets can be fun but some secrets can be dangerous. If a stranger or a friend you have only met online asks you to keep a secret then you need to tell an adult you trust straight away because they might not be who they say they are. People who respect you will never ask you to keep secrets from other people who are close to you like your friends and family.

Sharing information

Technology means that the things we share online can be seen by lots of people. Information can also be shared really quickly. It’s always smart to think before you post. Ask yourself what could happen if other people like your family or your teachers saw what you were sharing online.

Staying safer in social networks

  • Use privacy settings – they’re there to protect you not restrict you. A guide to setting your privacy settings has been published by ParentInfo
  • Some websites ask you to use your real name but you may be able to choose a username too. Use a nickname if you can.
  • Avoid using a picture of yourself for your profile – use a picture of something you like instead.
  • Don’t include personal details in your profile, like your phone number, your email address or home address.
  • Read the small print. For lots of social networks you have to sign up certain things, and some of those things could include rights to share what you’re posting online. Know what you’re signing up for.
  • Don’t accept friend requests from people you don’t know offline. If you are going to accept them, be very careful about what information you share with them.
  • Find out how you can report people on the websites you’re using.
  • Block someone if they are being mean or sending you things you don’t like.
  • Only ever speak with someone on a webcam if you know and trust them offline.
  • Remember that what someone does on a webcam can be recorded.
  • Say no to things you don’t want to do. If you don’t want to go on a webcam you don’t have to. If someone is cool they’ll respect that.
  • Listen to yourself. If a person or situation online doesn’t feel right trust your instincts and speak to someone offline who you trust for advice and help.

To find out more about staying safe in social networks check out Think You Know and Childline.

Click on the following logos to access the safety/support areas for each social network.

Your online activity

Our children learn things from us so how we as adults behave online affects how our children behave.

In terms of your own online reputation, nearly all of the advice for children is relevant for adults.

  • Be careful what you share.
  • Know who you’re sharing information with.
  • Understand that whatever you share online you might lose control of.
  • Always report abuse.

General things to think about for you and your family

Use the tools available to keep your family and your devices safer

  • Set up parental controls. Some systems have them built in and are free, others you can pay for. You may want to look at several options and decide what’s best for your family.
  • Keep your technology (including phones) up to date with security software.
  • Use strong passwords that include letters, numbers and symbols and use different passwords for different accounts.
  • If you’re using social networks, check out the privacy settings and make sure they are activated.
  • Report online abuse.

Create a great online reputation

  • Search for yourself and members of your family online. This will help you manage what information is available about you in the public domain.
  • Treat others online as you would like to be treated.
  • Delete old accounts that you’re no longer using.

Be careful of what you share online

  • Read the terms and conditions for social networks. There might be a lot there to read but you could be agreeing to hand over control of your online content if you don’t.
  • Never share personal information like phone numbers or email addresses online.
  • Be cautious about the type of information you might be sharing with people you only know online.
  • Be careful about the types of images you post and share as once they are out there you’ve pretty much lost control of that content.
  • Use webcams carefully. If you’re talking with people you know and trust offline you may be confident, but remember that webcam ‘conversations’ can always be recorded.

Find the right balance

  • Be sensible about the amount of time your family is spending online. The internet isn’t going anywhere but that warm weather might!

General family online safety advice

For general online safety advice we recommend a trip to Get Safe Online.

Ofsted and Online Safety

Schools have wide-ranging responsibilities relating to online safety, including both dealing with incidents and providing education. School provision will be inspected by Ofsted. The Ofsted Outstanding grade descriptors include:

  • Pupils work hard with the school to prevent all forms of bullying, including online bullying and prejudice-based bullying.
  • Pupils have an excellent understanding of how to stay safe online and of the dangers of inappropriate use of mobile technology and social networking sites

To achieve both of the above, schools will need to provide regular, appropriate education for all pupils taking account of any special education needs or disabilities or any other factors affecting the young person. This education should be embedded across the curriculum and should be ongoing rather than a one-off exercise.

UKCCIS Education for the Connected World Framework

The UK Council for Child Internet Safety (UKCCIS), a group of over 200 organisations working in partnership, has produced a framework describing what knowledge and skills children and young people need to navigate the digital world. Schools and colleges are encouraged to map their digital literacy current activities to the framework to identify gaps and possible improvements to their current programme.

The framework covers the following areas:

  • Self-image and Identity
  • Online relationships
  • Online reputation
  • Online bullying
  • Managing online information
  • Health, wellbeing and lifestyle
  • Privacy and security
  • Copyright and ownership

SWGfL Digital Literacy Curriculum

SWGfL have developed a free digital literacy curriculum together with the US organisation ‘CommonSenseMedia’, which covers all age groups and provides multiple activities in each area of the curriculum. It covers the following eight areas:

  • Internet safety
  • Privacy & security
  • Relationships & communication
  • Cyberbullying
  • Information literacy
  • Self-image & identity
  • Digital footprint & reputation
  • Creative credit & copyright

Up to Year 9, there are five lessons covering one or more of these areas with links to resources; for years 10-13, there are four units each with five modules. For each set of lessons there are also ideas about what opportunities there are to embed the ideas from the lesson across the curriculum, which are available here.

Other online safety programmes

There are also other programmes such as the Childnet Digital Leaders programme and e-Cadets programmes which are peer-led programmes and the ParentZone Digital Schools Membership which are aimed more at staff and parents. Peer-led programmes where older children help to educate younger children are often very practical, realistic and relevant. These are in addition to programmes aimed at bullying for example the Diana award Anti-Bullying Campaign or the Anti-Bullying Alliance All together campaigns.

SSCT Online Safety Newsletters

We are continuing our termly online safety newsletters for parents and professionals. The parent’s newsletter may be sent out by email or placed on your website. To sign up to receive newsletters please click here.

Newsletter alerts are sent out by e-mail with PDF versions available to download.

Key Stage One

Education for KS1 should explore the appropriateness of content that children are viewing and sharing (some of them may have YouTube channels or be using other apps to share images and videos), who they are in contact with and the differences between an online ‘friend’ and a real friend.

For the older group of KS1, children should have the opportunity to think about how to behave towards each other and what to do if they have negative experiences, especially the importance of getting an adult to help them.

Ask before you watch (Safer Internet Day 2017)

Red and Murphy talk to Freddie and Alisha about watching videos online. They explore what children should do before they watch videos on YouTube and or if they see something upsetting online? The video is also available with BSL or subtitles. Complementary education packs for 5-7 year olds can also be downloaded here.

More information

Digiduck’s Big Decision (Childnet)

The Digiduck® collection has been created to help parents and teachers educate children aged 3 – 7 about how to be a good friend online. The collection now includes a book, PDF and interactive app. Help arrives just in time for Digiduck® when faced with a difficult decision! Follow Digiduck® and his pals in this story of friendship and responsibility online.

More information

How to make an avatar (Safer Internet Day 2017)

Red and Murphy talk to Freddie and Alisha about watching videos online. What should children do before they watch videos on YouTube and what should they do if they see something upsetting online? The video is also available with BSL or subtitles. Complementary education packs for 5-7 year olds can also be downloaded.

More information

Lee and Kim (ThinkUKnow)

Lee and Kim is a short animated film designed for young children. It follows two primary school aged children who are playing an online game. The cartoon highlights the importance of being safe online, and helps children to spot important online behaviours such as being kind to other people and not talking to strangers. This video is available from the THINKUKNOW website together with some fun activities and a song. Alternatively, the video is available from the CEOP YouTube channel and is also available with BSL or subtitles.

More information

Share Aware (NSPCC)

The Share Aware teaching resources and lesson plans have been created to provide straightforward, no-nonsense advice which will untangle the web, and let you know how, as a teacher or practitioner, you can show your pupils ways to be to be safe online. The central message is that the internet is a great place for children to be and being Share Aware makes it safer. These teaching resources support you to deliver the ‘stay safe’ messages to pupils. They’ve been written in conjunction with teachers, producers of educational resources and experts from the NSPCC – and have been piloted in primary schools to make sure that pupils respond to them.

More information

Smartie the Penguin (Childnet)

Follow the adventures of Smarties the Penguin as he learns to be safe on the internet. There are Powerpoint versions of the story for EYFS, Year 1 and 2, a lesson plan and a song available here. The material covers: pop ups and in app purchasing, inappropriate websites for older children, and online bullying.

More information

SWGFL Digital Literacy Programme

These free online safety materials are designed to empower pupils and students to think critically, behave safely, and participate responsibly in our digital world. Find the lessons that are just right for your classroom. Browse by Key Stage or Year Group, for cross-curricular lessons which address digital literacy and citizenship topics in an age-appropriate way.

More information

Take a minute (Safer Internet Day 2018)

Red and Murphy talk about what it feels like when being online becomes too much. Also available with BSL and subtitles from YouTube/Vimeo. The education for 5-7 year olds contain an assembly, lesson plan and other activities.

More information

UK Council for Child Internet Safety (UKCCIS) Education for a Connected World Framework

The Education for a Connected World framework describes the Digital knowledge and skills that children and young people should have the opportunity to develop at different ages and stages of their lives. It highlights what a child should know in terms of current online technology, its influence on behaviour and development, and what skills they need to be able to navigate it.

More information

Webster’s Technology Books (Hannah Whaley)

Webster’s technology is a series of books that feature a cartoon spider and are written in a rhyming style: the series currently comprises Webster’s email, Websters bedtime, Webster’s friend and Webster’s manners. Each covers a different aspect of using technology safely. Available in paperback and electronic edition from online book sellers.

More information

Key Stage Two

Education for KS2 children should build on that provided for KS1. Children should be exploring privacy settings, blocking and reporting and thinking about what the effects of sharing content could be in the future. The biggest risk to children at this age is getting into unpleasant conversations with friends from school and the potential fall-out from this or escalation into bullying. Ensuring children know what to do if they see or experience this type of behaviour online is a key focus.

Age-appropriate discussions about grooming should be had, as well as about youth produced sexual imagery as more and more cases of this are being seen in primary schools. Some children may have YouTube channels or may be using other platforms where they share content, for example Instagram or Snapchat.

Online gaming is also something many of children are involved with, even if they do not have a games console, and this can lead to children experiencing very inappropriate content and playing games with unsuitable people.

One of the major challenges is to help children to look at the risks of their own behaviour rather than just the abstract concept of risk. Exploring these topics in a number of different ways across the curriculum gives the best chance of children learning these risks.

#LiveSkills (ThinkUKnow)

#LiveSkills is a package of resources focusing on live streaming. It explores the nuanced features of live streaming, and the specific risks children and young people can face. Live streaming is increasingly becoming one of the most popular online activities for children and young people and most apps now have live streaming functions.

The package for year olds explores self-esteem and positive and negative attention.

The session for 11+ includes an exploration of dealing with online pressure including identifying the various tactics that offenders use online to pressure young people and recognising some of the internal pressures young people can feel – including the impact of attention and gaining followers.

More information

Band Runner (ThinkUKnow)

Band Runner is a fun new runner-style game for 8-10 year olds on the Thinkuknow website. The game features some familiar faces: Sam, Alfie and Ellie from the Play Like Share animations are continuing their adventures and helping children to build their knowledge, confidence and skills to stay safe from sexual abuse and other risks they might encounter online.

More information

Be internet legends (ParentZone and Google)

ParentZone have worked with Google to provide a free scheme of work for KS2. Teachers can order one pack each but more than one pack per school can be ordered. The lesson plans are accredited by the PSHE Association and these are accompanied by stickers and a poster. The scheme consists of five pillars to be Sharp, Alert, Secure, Kind and Brave. The children are also encouraged to share information with parents and carers.  Schools can also request an assembly from the Google Internet Legends team by ticking a box on the order form.

More information

How I feel online (Safer Internet Day 2018)

The education packs for Safer Internet Day 2018 for 7-11 year olds contain an assembly, lesson plan and other activities for these age groups together with a video ‘How I feel online’ which features young people in KS2 discussing how they would feel if they were being encouraged to be mean to others online. Also available with BSL and subtitles from YouTube/Vimeo.

More information

I saw your willy (NSPCC Share Aware)

Increasing numbers of primary school age children are known to be sharing personal images of themselves. This video would be suitable to children in KS2 who you might be concerned are at risk. Alex’s friend shares a picture of Alex with his friend Katie for a joke, but Katie shares it with lots of people online leading to Alex getting bullied and being upset. There is a cartoon video and lesson plans with activities, extension work, homework and a slideshow presentation which is available here

More information

Lucy and the Boy (NSPCC Share Aware)

Lucy and the Boy is a resource explaining to children about what is and isn’t suitable to share online. There is a cartoon video and lesson plan with activities, extension work and homework, with a slide presentation also available. The video contains closed captions and is available here.

More information

OwnIt (BBC)

A comprehensive resource featuring real-life stories, advice from experts, fun quizzes, and videos with CBBC presenters, celebs, and star vloggers suitable for KS2/3.

This resource is designed to be browsed by children but could also be used in the classroom. Highlights include videos on:

  • Should mobile phones be banned in school?
  • Seven ways to smash back-to-school!
  • Managing parents.

May also be worth sharing with parents to help them talk to their children.

More information

Play Like Share (ThinkUKnow)

Play Like Share is a three-episode animated series and accompanying resource pack that aims to help 8-10 year olds learn how to stay safe from sexual abuse, exploitation and other risks they might encounter online. There is an accompanying resource pack containing guidance, photocopiable workbooks, materials to engage parents and carers and extension sessions designed to be delivered to particularly risk-taking or vulnerable children, that address; self-esteem, commercial risks, privacy and security and online grooming. The video comes with closed captions and is available here. The video is also available from the CEOP YouTube channel here.

More information

Power of image Photography project (Safer Internet Day 2017)

Safer Internet Day 2017 featured a photography project which explores different aspects of the power of image: from the pressure to take the perfect selfie, to the ways that images can be misleading or ambiguous, the six photography briefs challenge young people to consider the impact of images on their lives, while also celebrating the positive power of image to help inspire a better internet. The six briefs are: Be the change, Look outside the frame, Seeing is not always believing, Picture perfect, Personal information clues, Being me. A gallery of already created images is also available for discussion.

More information

Resources about critical thinking: fake websites

The following websites can be used to test students’ critical thinking skills to see if they believe everything they see online:

More information

Share Aware (NSPCC)

The Share Aware teaching resources and lesson plans have been created to provide straightforward, no-nonsense advice which will untangle the web, and let you know how, as a teacher or practitioner, you can show your pupils ways to be to be safe online. The central message is that the internet is a great place for children to be and being Share Aware makes it safer. These teaching resources support you to deliver the ‘stay safe’ messages to pupils. They’ve been written in conjunction with teachers, producers of educational resources and experts from the NSPCC – and have been piloted in primary schools to make sure that pupils respond to them.

More information

Stay Safe (CBBC)

The CBBC section on the BBC website has a number of resources suitable for KS2/3 including quizzes, videos and Newsround reports. Some of the most engaging are the songs and sketches created by the Horrible Histories team including Protect thy privacy settings featuring Guy Fawkes, What happens when you lie about your age online featuring the prudish Victorians, Lady Jane Grey Beware what you download and Saxon Monk in Internet videos are Forever. These are all accessible here. CBBC also have an Anti-bullying playlist on their YouTube channel and a collection of anti-bullying week videos on their website which includes videos about people being bullied because of various differences such as because they are clever, the colour or their hair, their faith, the fact they are transgender and because they were born in another country.

More information

SWGFL Digital Literacy Programme

These free online safety materials are designed to empower pupils and students to think critically, behave safely, and participate responsibly in our digital world. Find the lessons that are just right for your classroom. Browse by Key Stage or Year Group, for cross-curricular lessons which address digital literacy and citizenship topics in an age-appropriate way.

More information

The Adventures of Kara, Winston and the SMART Crew from Childnet

The five videos cover Safe (not sharing personal details), Meet, Accept, Reliable and Tell or SMART. These cartoons illustrate the five online safety SMART rules and include a real life SMART crew of young people, who guide the cartoon characters in their quest, and help them make safe online decisions. There is a supporting quiz and other resources, and the videos are available in BSL, subtitle and clicker versions and there is a copy of the SMART rules in symbols. This is all available here. Please note this resource was updated in 2016 to include a different SMART crew of young people to be more relevant.

More information

The bigger picture (Safer Internet Day 2017)

The education pack for Safer Internet Day 2017 for 7-11 year olds contains an assembly, a play and other activities for this age group together with a video called ‘The Bigger Picture.’ The film looks at the power of images online – how an image can create an impression and how often there is more than meets the eye in an image. It looks at a series of parts of images and asks children what they think is happening and sees how their views change depending on how much of the picture they can see. Also available in BSL and with subtitles from Youtube/Vimeo.

More information

Trust Me: a critical thinking resource (Childnet)

The main aim of the Trust Me resource is to educate young people around inaccurate and pervasive information that they might come across online. The primary and secondary education packs contain lesson plans, activities and presentations covering content and contacts online and the secondary pack also looks at propaganda.

More information

UK Council for Child Internet Safety (UKCCIS) Education for a Connected World Framework

The Education for a Connected World framework describes the Digital knowledge and skills that children and young people should have the opportunity to develop at different ages and stages of their lives. It highlights what a child should know in terms of current online technology, its influence on behaviour and development, and what skills they need to be able to navigate it.

More information

Key Stage Three +

Education for KS3+ young people is more complex as issues of peer pressure, sexual development, body image and mental health can be more prominent as well as young people taking a greater responsibility for their online activity and many having mobile phones.

The topics relating to online bullying and grooming, youth produced sexual imagery and radicalisation need to be tackled in a way which will engage young people to think about their own actions and when they need to protect others. This will include an exploration of criminal activity as well as looking at the safeguarding context and how school will respond if certain types of issues come to light. In particular, grooming and youth produced sexual imagery will also overlap with sex and relationship education issues such as viewing pornography, healthy relationships, domestic abuse, violence against women and girls and so on (see separate section on resources).

Both online bullying and radicalisation need to be discussed in the context of discrimination and hate incidents/crimes.

#LiveSkills (ThinkUKnow)

#LiveSkills is a package of resources focusing on live streaming. It explores the nuanced features of live streaming, and the specific risks children and young people can face. Live streaming is increasingly becoming one of the most popular online activities for children and young people and most apps now have live streaming functions.

The package for year olds explores self-esteem and positive and negative attention.

The session for 11+ includes an exploration of dealing with online pressure including identifying the various tactics that offenders use online to pressure young people and recognising some of the internal pressures young people can feel – including the impact of attention and gaining followers.

More information

Bullying videos (Childline)

The Childline website and a number of the Voicebox videos on YouTube explore bullying and a list of their playlists is available here. The playlists are split into different categories and the bullying-specific section is accessible here. The Voicebox videos feature mostly youngish adults and are short discussions about various different topics. The videos are produced on a weekly basis so it is worth signing up to the channel for notifications.

More information

Exploited (ThinkUKnow)

This 18-minute film helps young people learn to stay safe from sexual exploitation and helps educate young people to identify features of an exploitative friendship or relationship in contrast with the development of a healthy relationship.

It also gives them clear information about how to report abuse and access support.

More information

Exposed (ThinkUKnow)

This film explores the idea of ‘nude selfies’ in the context of a teenage relationship.

Dee has a boyfriend whom, as a part of a consensual relationship, she sends a nude image to. The audience then begin to see how easily a person can lose control of their image as Dee’s photo is shared around the school. Dee thinks of ways she can take control of the situation and advises the audience on the risks of sharing nude selfies.

The audience are encouraged to think about the emotional and social consequences of a nude selfie being shared.

More information

Fight against porn zombies (FAPZ) (Childline)

Childline has a lot of information aimed at children of 12+ about the realities of watching pornography. They also have a series of cartoons aimed at boys available on their YouTube channel here. Episode 1 looks at how boys can have their perception of sex altered by watching pornography and how it can lead to objectifying women. Episode 2 looks at how pornography can lead to people feeling they have to re-enact what they see. Episode 3 looks at the peer pressure to have sex. There are also information films that explore the topic further. Be aware that the cartoons are quite explicit: the main authority figure in the cartoons is called Professor Ophelia Balls and there are other characters with similarly ‘on-the-edge’ names.

More information

Gaming Addiction (MindEd)

MindEd is an organisation that provides education about children and young people’s mental health for professionals and parents. It has a section on parenting in the digital world covering the risks etc but also includes an animated video where Mark discusses his gaming addiction. Available on the MindEd website here.

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I am Holly (Bedford High School, Greater Manchester)

This powerful video from Bedford High School looks at online and offline bullying and shows how someone being bullied might feel. It also describes how we can help someone who is being bullied by standing up to bullying.

More information

Just send it (Childnet)

Part of the Crossing the Line PHSE toolkit. Abi and her friends love to live their lives online; sharing top tips, fashion ideas and fun stories. The film includes closed caption subtitles and is available here. When her online comments catch the attention of Josh, a boy well known in the school, she is excited. As friendship grows and their like for each other develops, it’s not long before Josh’s friend encourages him to pressurise Abi to send a nude selfie. She’s not keen to do this and seeks the advice of her friends. Mixed opinions and increasing pressure from Josh soon encourage her to change her mind to take the photo. Although Josh intends to delete the photo, his friend Brandon intercepts the picture and sends it on to others online, which causes much distress for Abi.

More information

Like Me (TrueTube)

TRUETUBE contains RE, PSHE and Citizenship resources. The video LikeMe uses a fast moving format to show how people interact online and is accessible here. School is over for the day, and Sophia is straight online with her friends, sharing messages and photos, but then someone shares too much and this has a massive impact for Sophia. Teachers’ notes containing discussion topics and activities are available.

More information

Picture This (Childnet)

A drama-based educational sexting resource that addresses and questions the sensitive issue of sending sexually explicit messages or photos electronically with 11-16 year olds. By asking young people to step into the shoes of the characters within Picture This, they explore the law, impact and consequence of sexting and are encouraged to contemplate their online behaviour. The pack comprises of a 25-minute play script and lesson plans that seek to educate and enlighten young people about the consequences of creating and sending indecent images. Young people can decide their own ending for this play, formed from all that they have learned throughout the lessons.

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Selfie Shack (Safer Internet Day 2017)

This video from Safer Internet Day 2017 for 11-18 year olds features young people in KS3 talking about what they like about taking selfies and what the pressures are to take ‘perfect’ selfies. There is also an education pack containing an assembly, lesson plan and other activities. Video also available with BSL and subtitles from YouTube/Vimeo.

 

More information

Sending nudes (Sussex police)

Two animated videos looking at the risks of sending nudes of yourself and the consequences of sharing images of others. Both videos include closed captions and are available here.

More information

So You Got Naked Online (SWGFL)

‘So you got naked online’ is a leaflet that helps and advises young people who may find themselves in a situation where they (or a friend) have put a sexting image or video online and have lost control over that content and who it’s being shared with. It is available as a 15-page booklet or handout flyer. There is a cost to purchase these, but more information can be found on the suppliers website.

More information

Stay safe, don’t send (The Children’s Society)

This is an animated resource about the effects of youth produced sexual imagery concentrating on the Gypsy, Roma and travelling communities as part of a project trying to keep young people in those communities safe from Child Sexual Exploitation. Other resources include an activity book, guide for practitioners, posters and leaflets which are available here.

More information

SWGFL Digital Literacy Programme

These free online safety materials are designed to empower pupils and students to think critically, behave safely, and participate responsibly in our digital world. Find the lessons that are just right for your classroom. Browse by Key Stage or Year Group, for cross-curricular lessons which address digital literacy and citizenship topics in an age-appropriate way.

More information

ThinkUKnow

The THINKUKNOW education programme covers children and young people online, relationships, sex and young people and sexual abuse and exploitation: it does not cover bullying. The THINKUKNOW website has specific areas of its website for 11-13 and 14-18 year olds, a selection of videos aimed at KS3 and 4 and also the THINKUKNOW toolkit called ‘Sex the Internet’ and ‘You’ which contain 15 activities, some of which use the THINKUKNOW website to explore various different topics including friending, digital reputation, passwords, selfies and privacy. The ‘Consequences’ video is useful because it demonstrates offender behaviour. The professionals’ resources are available here and amongst these there are a number of videos available with BSL or subtitles. You will need to register for a free THINKUKNOW account to access and download resources and you will need to have attended a THINKUKNOW introduction course in order to access some of the resources.

More information

Trust Me: a critical thinking resource (Childnet)

The main aim of the Trust Me resource is to educate young people around inaccurate and pervasive information that they might come across online. The primary and secondary education packs contain lesson plans, activities and presentations covering content and contacts online and the secondary pack also looks at propaganda.

More information

UK Council for Child Internet Safety (UKCCIS) Education for a Connected World Framework

The Education for a Connected World framework describes the Digital knowledge and skills that children and young people should have the opportunity to develop at different ages and stages of their lives. It highlights what a child should know in terms of current online technology, its influence on behaviour and development, and what skills they need to be able to navigate it.

More information

VoiceBox (Childline)

The Voicebox videos on YouTube feature mostly youngish adults and are short discussions about various different topics including online safety and bullying. The videos are produced on a weekly basis so it is worth signing up to the channel for notifications. Other material can be found on the Childline website

More information

Zipit app (Childline)

The Zipit app aims to help teenagers deal with difficult sexting and flirting situations. The app offers humorous comebacks and advice, and aims to help teenagers stay in control of flirting when chatting. Search for ‘zipit’ in your app store.

More information

SEN

Josh and Sue (ThinkUKnow)

Josh and Sue is an animated film which covers issues around online bullying, sharing information and who are real friends. This animation has been designed to be used with young people learning difficulties. There are two different commentaries, one for those with mild to moderate needs and another for moderate to severe needs. There is no complex story and there are clear tick and cross symbols for when an action by one of the characters is safe or not safe. There are supporting activities and lesson plans to go with the video. All this is available here.

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STAR toolkit (Childnet)

The STAR toolkit consists of practical advice and 15 teaching activities to help educators explore online safety with young people with autism spectrum disorders in Key Stage 3 and 4. The sections consist of Safe, Trust, Action and Respect. All sections feature the concept of friendship and have a focus on finding the balance between online and offline interaction. Most of the activities are not complete lessons, but starter activities or similar. For a review of the activities, please click here.

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Thinking about Staying Safe on the Internet (Dimensions)

Short document giving general internet safety advice for young people and adults in Easy Read Format

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Sexting/CSE/sexual Resources

There are numerous resources available for education on sexting (youth produced sexual imagery), CSE and other sexual content. Below is a collection of resources aimed at different groups of young people.

#Listentoyourselfie (Childline)

The #Listentoyourselfie campaign from Childline looks at healthy and unhealthy relationships. There are stories that are presented in written and video form and a checklist of what’s healthy and what’s not.

  • The Party: Lara meets an older boy Dan and they start a relationship. Dan comes to Lara’s house while she is having a party with her friends and he starts to pressure her into having sex.
  • The Game: Paul has an online friend JJ who he talks to about being gay or possibly bisexual. JJ sends Paul a naked picture and asks for one in return.

Both videos are available with closed captions and can be viewed here.

More information

Disrespect Nobody (Home Office)

The Disrespect Nobody campaign from the Home Office focuses on healthy relationships. There is a website with information about sexting, relationship abuse, consent, rape, pornography, and where to get help. There are also videos about sexting, relationship abuse and consent. The videos are animated but suitable for young people and try to be practical and humorous. The videos come with closed captions and can be accessed here.

More information

Exploited (ThinkUKnow)

This 18-minute film helps young people learn to stay safe from sexual exploitation and helps educate young people to identify features of an exploitative friendship or relationship in contrast with the development of a healthy relationship.

It also gives them clear information about how to report abuse and access support.

More information

Exposed (ThinkUKnow)

This film explores the idea of ‘nude selfies’ in the context of a teenage relationship.

Dee has a boyfriend whom, as a part of a consensual relationship, she sends a nude image to. The audience then begin to see how easily a person can lose control of their image as Dee’s photo is shared around the school. Dee thinks of ways she can take control of the situation and advises the audience on the risks of sharing nude selfies.

The audience are encouraged to think about the emotional and social consequences of a nude selfie being shared.

More information

Fight against porn zombies (FAPZ) (Childline)

Childline has a lot of information aimed at children of 12+ about the realities of watching pornography. They also have a series of cartoons aimed at boys available on their YouTube channel here. Episode 1 looks at how boys can have their perception of sex altered by watching pornography and how it can lead to objectifying women. Episode 2 looks at how pornography can lead to people feeling they have to re-enact what they see. Episode 3 looks at the peer pressure to have sex. There are also information films that explore the topic further. Be aware that the cartoons are quite explicit: the main authority figure in the cartoons is called Professor Ophelia Balls and there are other characters with similarly ‘on-the-edge’ names.

More information

I saw your willy (NSPCC Share Aware)

Increasing numbers of primary school age children are known to be sharing personal images of themselves. This video would be suitable to children in KS2 who you might be concerned are at risk. Alex’s friend shares a picture of Alex with his friend Katie for a joke, but Katie shares it with lots of people online leading to Alex getting bullied and being upset. There is a cartoon video and lesson plans with activities, extension work, homework and a slideshow presentation which is available here

More information

It’s Not Because He Loves You (Cambridgeshire Police)

A teenage girl talks about her relationship with Jake, an older boy. Jake buys her gifts and a phone and is displaying controlling behaviour including sharing naked images of her. The film explores the feelings of the young person. It is sometimes difficult for young people and adults to identify these types of abusive situations as children and young people may believe they are in a loving, consensual relationship. The video is available to view here.

More information

Just send it (Childnet)

Part of the Crossing the Line PHSE toolkit. Abi and her friends love to live their lives online; sharing top tips, fashion ideas and fun stories. The film includes closed caption subtitles and is available here. When her online comments catch the attention of Josh, a boy well known in the school, she is excited. As friendship grows and their like for each other develops, it’s not long before Josh’s friend encourages him to pressurise Abi to send a nude selfie. She’s not keen to do this and seeks the advice of her friends. Mixed opinions and increasing pressure from Josh soon encourage her to change her mind to take the photo. Although Josh intends to delete the photo, his friend Brandon intercepts the picture and sends it on to others online, which causes much distress for Abi.

More information

Kayleigh’s Love Story (Leicestershire Police)

Kayleigh’s love story is an online grooming case from October 2015 that ended tragically. This video re-enacts the last two weeks of 15-year old Kayleigh Haywood’s life when she was groomed on Facebook by a 27-year old male and then went to visit the man. Kayleigh was raped and murdered by the man and his next door neighbour. Both men were subsequently convicted of serious offences and received substantial prison sentences. The video has been made with the support of Kayleigh’s family and would be rated 15 if it were to be shown in the cinema. The video and the accompanying information is available here.

More information

Picture This (Childnet)

A drama-based educational sexting resource that addresses and questions the sensitive issue of sending sexually explicit messages or photos electronically with 11-16 year olds. By asking young people to step into the shoes of the characters within Picture This, they explore the law, impact and consequence of sexting and are encouraged to contemplate their online behaviour. The pack comprises of a 25-minute play script and lesson plans that seek to educate and enlighten young people about the consequences of creating and sending indecent images. Young people can decide their own ending for this play, formed from all that they have learned throughout the lessons.

More information

Sending nudes (Sussex police)

Two animated videos looking at the risks of sending nudes of yourself and the consequences of sharing images of others. Both videos include closed captions and are available here.

More information

Stay safe, don’t send (The Children’s Society)

This is an animated resource about the effects of youth produced sexual imagery concentrating on the Gypsy, Roma and travelling communities as part of a project trying to keep young people in those communities safe from Child Sexual Exploitation. Other resources include an activity book, guide for practitioners, posters and leaflets which are available here.

More information

Zipit app (Childline)

The Zipit app aims to help teenagers deal with difficult sexting and flirting situations. The app offers humorous comebacks and advice, and aims to help teenagers stay in control of flirting when chatting. Search for ‘zipit’ in your app store.

More information

Sexting Guidance for Schools

Click here for further information.

Parents

Internet Matters

This website is set up in partnership with many of the technology companies to give parents and carers information. Information is split into advice which includes sections for different age children, controls and expert articles. There are a number of short videos, in particular April’s story about a young girl sharing naked images and Jack’s story about being bullied on online gaming.

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Learning Disabilities, Autism and Internet Safety: A Guide for Parents (Ambitious about Autism, Mencap and Cerebra)

This guide from leading organisations outlines some suggestions to help parents limit the risk of their child having negative experiences online and understand what action can be taken if they do.

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NSPCC webpages and Helpline

The NSPCC web pages on online safety cover everything a parent needs to know including how to talk to their children about issues, how to make agreements in the family to keep everyone safe and how to manage time online. There are also reviews of websites, games and apps in the NetAware section. It also signposts parents to NSPCC webpages or for more specific questions to the 24 hour online safety helpline for parents on 0808 800 5002, that is run in association with O2; where parents and carers can speak to a specialist practitioner.

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Online gaming: an introduction for parents and carers (Childnet)

Internet safety advice is directly applicable to the gaming environment. It is essential that children are aware of the potential issues and are given the skills and knowledge to help manage and reduce these risks, with the help of those around them. A PDF fact sheet is available to download here that covers how games are played, what the risks are, how to keep children safe, etc. Further resources are available here.

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Parent Info (Parentzone and CEOP)

Parent Info is a free resource for schools and other organisations, providing expertise and advice to parents and carers on a range of subjects including digital issues and online safety. Schools and other organisations can host Parent Info directly on their own website, offering parents and carers support with easy access to up-to-date articles, research and practical advice.

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Parenting in a digital world (Minded for families)

MindEd is an organisation that provides education about children and young people’s mental health. They have a sections on how much time young people spend on the internet, what are the risks and social media etc. This is also available in easy read PDF here.

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Staff Led Parent Online Safety Presentation (Childnet)

This online safety presentation for parents is designed to be delivered by the online safety lead, or designated staff member, in your school, organisation or child care setting.
Online safety is a whole community issue and this presentation is designed to improve parents’ knowledge and understanding of the risks their child may face online. It also provides practical strategies and advice to help parents support their child online and signposts to further resources and reporting sites which may be of use.

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Digital Parenting (Issue 1, November 2010)

Added: 26/03/2018 at 9:57 am Category: Online Safety

Digital Parenting (Issue 2, September 2012)

Added: 26/03/2018 at 9:57 am Category: Online Safety

Digital Parenting (Issue 3, September 2015)

Added: 26/03/2018 at 9:56 am Category: Online Safety

Digital Parenting (Issue 4, September 2015)

Added: 26/03/2018 at 9:56 am Category: Online Safety

Digital Parenting (Issue 5, October 2016)

Added: 26/03/2018 at 9:54 am Category: Online Safety

Digital Parenting (Issue 6, September 2017)

Added: 26/03/2018 at 9:54 am Category: Online Safety

Internet and phone bullying (Surrey Police)

Added: 16/10/2018 at 2:55 pm Category: Online Safety

This factsheet gives examples of online bullying, explains who can help and how to keep safe – in Easy Read format.

Learning Disabilities, Autism and Internet Safety

Added: 28/03/2018 at 10:42 am Category: Diversity, Health/Wellbeing, Online Safety

Families of children with disabilities often use the Internet as a key tool to keep them informed about their legal rights, appropriate treatments and services that might be available for their families. Parents often seek advice and support from online networking groups and forums and these can help us shape our plans for ensuring our children get the support they need.
This guide outlines some suggestions to help parents limit the risk of their child having negative experiences online and understand what action can be taken if they do. This guide also suggests some resources that will help children get the most out of the Internet at home and in the community. The guide will present some case studies of actual experiences people with learning disabilities and autism have had online and learning points that can be taken from these experiences.

Life in Likes

Added: 26/03/2018 at 10:21 am Category: Online Safety

This Children’s Commissioner’s report on the effects of social media on 8-to-12-year-olds examines the way children use social media and its effects on their wellbeing. ‘Life in Likes’ fills a gap in research showing how younger children use platforms which social media companies say are not designed for them. Whilst most social media sites have an official age limit of 13 years, some research has suggested ¾ of 10-to-12 year olds have a social media account.

Online Child Sexual Exploitation: Examining the Distribution of Captures of Live-streamed Child Sexual Abuse

Added: 18/05/2018 at 7:08 am Category: Online Safety, Safeguarding

A new study by the Internet Watch Foundation (IWF) has revealed shocking statistics on children being groomed, coerced and blackmailed into live-streaming their own sexual abuse over webcams, tablets and mobile phones.

Online Gaming: A guide for Parents and Carers (Childnet)

Added: 28/03/2018 at 10:43 am Category: Online Safety

Internet safety advice is directly applicable to the gaming environment. It is essential that children are aware of the potential issues and are given the skills and knowledge to help manage and reduce these risks, with the help of those around them. A PDF fact sheet is available to download here that covers how games are played, what the risks are, how to keep children safe, etc.

Sexting in schools and colleges: Responding to incidents

Added: 26/03/2018 at 10:18 am Category: Online Safety

This advice is for designated safeguarding leads (DSLs), their deputies, headteachers and senior leadership teams in schools and educational establishments in England.

Skin gambling: teenage Britain’s secret habit (Parentzone)

Added: 23/07/2018 at 8:45 am Category: Health/Wellbeing, Online Safety

This research began because one young person told us he thought skin gambling was a problem. It turned out he was not alone. Two in five young people who know about it agree. We share their concern. Our investigation has uncovered a complicated ecosystem of games, sites and services that knowingly and unknowingly facilitate gambling with virtual currencies. With the help of young gamers, we have learnt that in-game purchases and rewards can easily be used to gamble, and that young people have enterprising ways to fund gambling activity.

So You Got Naked Online

Added: 28/03/2018 at 10:31 am Category: Online Safety

A resource that offers children, young people and parents advice and strategies to support the issues resulting from sexting incidents. With help and advice for young people who may find themselves in a situation where they or a friend have put a sexting image or video online and have lost control over who it’s being shared with.

Staying safe online (National Autistic Society)

Added: 16/10/2018 at 2:55 pm Category: Online Safety, Safeguarding

Online article covering some of the benefits and risks of being online:
• Not understanding what other people mean
• Becoming obsessive
• Being vulnerable to bullying or abuse
• Misuse of money

Thinking about Staying Safe on the Internet (Dimensions)

Added: 16/10/2018 at 2:54 pm Category: Online Safety

Short document giving general internet safety advice for young people and adults in Easy Read Format.

Abbreviation

Meaning

143 I love you
182 I hate you
2DAY Today
420 Marijuana
4EAE For ever and ever
ADN Any day now
ADR Address
AFAIK As far as I know
AFK Away from keyboard
ASL Age/sex/location
ATM At the moment
BFN Bye for now
BOL Be on later
BRB Be right back
BTW By the way
CD9 Code 9 (means parents are around)
CTN Can’t talk now
DWBH Don’t worry, be happy
F2F Face to face
FTF Face to face
FWB Friends with benefits
FYEO For your eyes only
GAL Get a life
GB Goodbye
GLHF Good luck, have fun
GTG Got to go
GYPO Get your pants off
HAK Hugs and kisses
HAND Have a nice day
HTH Hope this helps
HTH Happy to help
HW Homework
IDK I don’t know
IIRC If I remember correctly
IKR I know, right?
ILU I love you
ILU I Love You
ILY I love you
IM Instant message
IMHO In my honest opinion
IMHO In my humble opinion
IMO In my opinion
IRL In real life
IU2U It’s up to you
IWSN I want sex now
IYKWIM If you know what I mean
J/K Just kidding
J4F Just for fun
JIC Just in case
JSYK Just so you know
KFY Kiss for you
KOTL Kiss On The Lips
KPC Keeping parents clueless
L8 Late
LMAO Laugh my ass off
LMBO Laughing my butt off
LMIRL Let’s meet in real life
LMIRL Let’s Meet In Real Life
LMK Let me know
LOL Laugh out loud
LSR Loser
MIRL Meet in real life
MOS Mum over shoulder
NAGI Not a good idea
NIFOC Nude in front of computer
NIFOC Nude In Front Of The Computer
NM Never mind
NMU Not much, you?
NP No problem
NTS Note to self
OIC Oh I see
OMG Oh my God
ORLY Oh, really?
OT Off topic
OTP On the phone
P911 Parent alert
P999 Parent Alert
PAL Parents Are Listening or Peace And Love
PAW Parents are watching
PCM Please call me
PIR Parent in room
PLS
PLZ Please call me
POS Parents over shoulder
PPL People
PTB Please text back
QQ Crying (produces an emoticon in text; often used sarcastically)
RAK Random act of kindness
RL Real life
ROFL Rolling on the floor laughing
RT Retweet
RU/18 Are You Over 18?
RUOK Are you okay?
SMH Shaking my head
SOS Someone over shoulder
SRSLY Seriously
SSDD Same s**t, different day
SWAK Sealed with a kiss
SWYP So, what’s your problem?
SYS See you soon
TBC To be continued
TDTM Talk dirty to me
TIME Tears in my eyes
TMI Too much information
TMRW Tomorrow
TTYL Talk to you later
TU Thank you
TY Thank you
VSF Very sad face
WB Welcome back
WTH What the heck?
WTH What the hell?
WTPA Where the party at?
WYCM Will you call me?
WYCM Will you call me?
WYRN What’s Your Real Name?
YGM You’ve got mail
YOLO You only live once
YW You’re welcome
ZOMG Oh my God (sarcastic)