News 2021: 10 items (Youth Justice)

27/09/2022: Keeping Young People In Contact With The Justice System Safe

Last Friday (23 September 2022), Her Majesty’s Inspectorate of Probation published the latest in their Research and Analysis Bulletin series: The identification of safety concerns relating to children. A key objective for those delivering youth offending services is to keep children and other people safe, which sits alongside and supports the all-important nurturing and strengths-focused work that helps children to realise their potential.

Read: Russell Webster

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21/09/2022: “Dysfunctional” Custody System Failing Girls

The national youth custody system is failing to provide very vulnerable girls with the environment and support they need, according to a joint thematic inspection by HM Inspectorate of Prisons, HM Inspectorate of Probation, Ofsted, Care Quality Commission (CQC) and Care Inspectorate Wales (CIW) published today (21 September 2022).

Read: Russell Webster

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21/09/2022: Howard League responds to inspection reports on girls in custody

The Howard League for Penal Reform has responded to His Majesty’s Inspectorate of Prisons’ thematic review of outcomes for girls in custody and the independent review of progress at HMYOI Wetherby and the Keppel unit, published today (Wednesday 21 September).

Read: The Howard League for Penal Reform

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16/09/2022: Neurodiversity And The Revolving Door Of Crisis And Crime

Revolving Doors on how neurodivergence affects people who are in repeat contact with the justice system for low-level offences, and how neurodivergence is a form of multiple disadvantage.

Read: Russell Webster

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15/09/2022: Constructive Resettlement For Children In Custody

Constructive Resettlement is an evidence-based framework that empowers practitioners to support children on their own personal journey towards a constructive future.

Read: Russell Webster

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14/09/2022: Youth Custody Service chief to step down

Helga Swidenbank is set to leave the Youth Custody Service (YCS), where she has been its executive director for the last four years. Prior to joining the service in September 2018 she spent three years as director of probation at London Community Rehabilitation Company, part of a national network of offender management companies working with the National Probation Service.

Read: Children and Young People Now

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11/08/2022: Child sexual abuse victims face longer delays to get to court as waiting times surge

Waiting to get to court can be extremely distressing for young victims, yet our research shows court waiting times for child sexual abuse cases have surged by 43% in four years.

Read: NSPCC

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09/08/2022: Best Practice In Resettling Children From Custody

Yesterday (8 August 2022) Clinks published the latest article in its online evidence library that I am lucky enough to curate. The evidence library was created to develop a far-reaching and accessible evidence base covering the most common types of activity undertaken within the criminal justice system.

Read: Russell Webster

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03/08/2022: Alliance for Youth Justice policy briefing on rethinking youth custody post-pandemic

This policy briefing prepared by the Alliance for Youth Justice is the third paper in a series of three aimed at understanding the challenges and opportunities created by the impact of the Covid-19 pandemic on children and the youth justice system.

Read: Youth Justice Legal Centre

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28/07/2022: Neurodivergent children ‘face more barriers in education and justice systems’

Neurodivergent children face more challenges than their peers when navigating both the education and youth justice systems in England and Wales, with some being labelled as “problem children” as early as year four, according to a new study.

Read: Children and Young People Now

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27/07/2022: The CPS launches its new ‘Defendants Strategy’, pledging to focus on Mental Health, Youth Justice and Disproportionality

The Crown Prosecution Service (“CPS”) has launched its ‘CPS Defendants: Fairness For All Strategy 2025’ which will focus on three key areas: mental health, youth justice and the proportionality of their decision-making.

Read: Youth Justice Legal Centre

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15/07/2022: The Process Of Going Through The Courts Is A Confusing One

Revolving Doors has just (13 July 2022) published interesting new research aimed at understanding why defendants do or do not engage across the criminal courts process, and how they could be better supported to engage with this process. In particular, the research (commissioned by the Courts Service) aimed to determine how defendants could be encouraged to take up legal representation where appropriate.

Read: Russell Webster

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14/07/2022: Government ‘has no plan or ambition’ for children’s secure estate

Youth justice campaigners have accused ministers of having “no clear central plan or ambition for the children’s secure estate”. This lack of focus of policy around the estate, combined with a predicted rise in the number of children in custody, has raised fears among campaigners that “conditions and outcomes” for young people in secure settings “will go from bad to worse”.

Read: Children and Young People Now

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14/07/2022: Police, Crime, Sentencing and Courts (PCSC) Act 2022 tightens the tests to be applied by the courts in order to remand children and young people into custodial remand

Section 157 of the Police, Crime, Sentencing and Courts Act 2022 amends the relevant provisions of the Legal Aid, Sentencing and Punishment of Offenders Act (LASPO) 2012 (sections 91-102) by introducing statutory duties to consider the best interests and welfare of the child in the remand decision and to record the reasons for a custodial remand.

Read: Youth Justice Legal Centre

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13/07/2022: Charlie Taylor: Children in youth custody ‘let down’

Children in the youth custody system are being “let down” by poor provision across all settings, the chief inspector of prisons has said. In his annual report on prisons in England and Wales, Charlie Taylor notes that while the number of children in custody fell to historical lows during the pandemic and noted that numbers had not increased meaningfully during the last year, “managers at all sites faced major challenges in recovering from the impact of Covid-19 and reintroducing education, offending behaviour programmes and resettlement provision”.

Read: Children and Young People Now

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