ACES too High

ACESTooHigh is a news site that reports on research about adverse childhood experiences, including developments in epidemiology, neurobiology, and the biomedical and epigenetic consequences of toxic stress. We also cover how people, organizations, agencies and communities are implementing practices based on the research. This includes developments in education, juvenile justice, criminal justice, public health, medicine, mental health, social services, and cities, counties and states.

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Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website

The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website has a vast amount of information on ACE. It includes a number of studies, data and resources.

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Cymru Well Wales: Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs)

Cymru Well Wales has committed to addressing ACEs and their impact in Wales by; making all public services in Wales able to respond effectively to prevent and mitigate the harms from ACEs, and by building protective factors and resilience in the population to cope with ACEs that cannot be prevented.

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PHE: Adverse Childhood Experiences

Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) are traumatic events that affect children while growing up, such as suffering child maltreatment or living in a household affected by domestic violence, substance misuse or mental illness. This short animated film has been developed to raise awareness of ACEs, their potential to damage health across the life course and the roles that different agencies can play in preventing ACEs and supporting those affected by them

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TED talk: How childhood trauma affects health across a lifetime

Childhood trauma isn’t something you just get over as you grow up. Pediatrician Nadine Burke Harris explains that the repeated stress of abuse, neglect and parents struggling with mental health or substance abuse issues has real, tangible effects on the development of the brain. This unfolds across a lifetime, to the point where those who’ve experienced high levels of trauma are at triple the risk for heart disease and lung cancer. An impassioned plea for pediatric medicine to confront the prevention and treatment of trauma, head-on.

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The Adverse Childhood Experiences Study — the Largest Public Health Study You Never Heard Of (Huffington Post)

“Adverse childhood experiences” has become a buzzword in social services, public health, education, juvenile justice, mental health, pediatrics, criminal justice, medical research and even business. The ACE Study – the CDC’s Adverse Childhood Experiences Study — has recently been featured in the New York Times, This American Life, and Salon.com. Many people say that just as you should what your cholesterol score is, so you should know your ACE score. But what is this study? And do you know your own ACE score?

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What’s your ACE score?

What’s Your ACE Score? (and, at the end, What’s Your Resilience Score?) There are 10 types of childhood trauma measured in the ACE Study. Five are personal — physical abuse, verbal abuse, sexual abuse, physical neglect, and emotional neglect. Five are related to other family members: a parent who’s an alcoholic, a mother who’s a victim of domestic violence, a family member in jail, a family member diagnosed with a mental illness, and the disappearance of a parent through divorce, death or abandonment. Each type of trauma counts as one. So a person who’s been physically abused, with one alcoholic parent, and a mother who was beaten up has an ACE score of three.

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