CEOP

Child safety smartwatches ‘easy’ to hack, watchdog says (18/10/2017)

Some smartwatches designed for children have security flaws that make them vulnerable to hackers, a watchdog has warned. The Norwegian Consumer Council (NCC) tested watches from brands including Gator and GPS for Kids. It said it discovered that attackers could track, eavesdrop or even communicate with the wearers. The manufacturers involved insist the problems have either already been resolved or are being addressed. UK retailer John Lewis has withdrawn one of the named smartwatch models from sale in response.

Full story: BBC

Daily Mail

Getting tipsy in front of the kids can harm their wellbeing: Parents may cause arguments, embarrassment and glamorise alcohol with their drinking (18/10/2017)

Parents who get tipsy in front of their children are having a negative impact on family life, according to a report. They are inclined to cause arguments, be less sensitive, disrupt bedtime routines or be a general source of embarrassment. Parents may also be unintentionally glamourising alcohol to their children by boasting about hangovers or how much they've downed. The Institute of Alcohol Studies said many adults were unaware that even low-level drinking may be negatively affecting children's wellbeing. Their research involved surveys of 997 parents and their children from a cross section of social backgrounds across the UK.

Full story: Daily Mail

CEOP

Fake news: a teenage dilemma (18/10/2017)

The other day I went up to Birmingham to gauge how teenagers are getting their news and, more importantly, whether they can distinguish fact from fiction. It is always dangerous to extrapolate from the specific experience or anecdote to a general view, and smart policy should be based on solid data. Nevertheless, I was alarmed by what we found out, and persuaded that whatever form it might take, news literacy is an area educators will need to think hard about.

Full story: BBC

Daily Mail

Is a stranger hacking your child's smart watch? Warning that loopholes in the devices are being targeted to track youngsters' movements (18/10/2017)

Smart watches sold to allow parents to keep track of their children and contact them in an emergency could be putting youngsters at risk. Consumer experts have revealed that strangers can access the watches, which parents use to call youngsters, to spy on children. As a result, the hi-tech devices, which can cost anything from £18 to £100, could be putting children in danger, rather than making them safer.

Full story: Daily Mail

CEOP

'I felt so low, I couldn't see a way out' (17/10/2017)

"To get to my school I had to cross a railway bridge and I would just stand there and think 'I could just jump off. It felt overwhelming and like I was alone. I just felt so, so low, I couldn't see a way out." Calleigh, now 18, was self-harming when she was 11 and first thought about taking her own life when she was 13. "I didn't want to tell my parents because I thought they would be worried and disappointed or not understand."Calleigh's story comes as the charity Childline says it has carried out its highest number of counselling sessions with young people having suicidal thoughts and feelings.

Full story: BBC

Guardian

More than 60 children a day calling Childline with suicidal thoughts (17/10/2017)

A children’s helpline conducted more than 60 counselling sessions on suicide every day last year with children as young as 10 reporting suicidal thoughts, according to the NSPCC children’s charity. The figures from Childline represent a 15% increase on the previous year. The NSPCC pointed to widespread concern about the lengthy waiting times young people face before accessing mental health services, but said the statistics also suggested a greater willingness on the part of young people to seek help. One 14-year-old girl told a counsellor: “I want to end it tonight. I’ve written a suicide note and have everything ready.”

Full story: Guardian

NSPCC

15% rise in Childline counselling sessions about suicide (17/10/2017)

Last year Childline carried out an average of 62 suicide counselling sessions a day. 22,456 counselling sessions were delivered to young people dealing with thoughts of ending their own lives - a rise of 15% compared to the previous year. It's revealed in the 2016/17 Childline annual review, Not Alone Anymore, that children as young as 10 got in touch about having suicidal thoughts and feelings. Childline is now calling for more people to volunteer as counsellors and potentially help save young people's lives.

Full story: NSPCC

CEOP

Should children be heard in English family court cases? (17/10/2017)

Children, campaigners and some judges are calling for a change in the law so that children at the heart of family cases in England and Wales can talk in private to the judge if they so choose. More than 100,000 children were involved in family court cases over the past year, according to the guardian service Cafcass. Many are at the centre of bitter fights - either between their parents or between their families and local authorities. The decisions made will have a fundamental impact on their lives.

Full story: BBC

TES

Trainee teachers don't understand safeguarding role, says Ofsted (17/10/2017)

Trainee teachers are not being made fully aware of their future role in safeguarding children, Ofsted warned today. Understanding safeguarding was one of the areas for improvement flagged up from the first stage inspections of initial teacher education this summer, Angela Milner, Ofsted's specialist HMI for initial teacher education, told a conference today. Ms Milner told the annual conference of the National Association of School-Based Teacher Trainers (NASBTT) that it was “worrying” that safeguarding was one of the weaker areas of professional training.

Full story: TES

TES

Virtual school heads 'lack resources to properly support children adopted from care' (17/10/2017)

Virtual school heads say a lack of resources will leave them unable to "do justice" to a change in the law that gives them new responsibilities for adopted children. The roles of virtual school heads and designated teachers – who are responsible for the educational achievements of looked-after children – were expanded in the Children and Social Work Act 2017. They now also have to provide information and advice to children who have left care in order to be adopted, as well as their new families.

Full story: TES

CYP Now

Thousands of parents 'unable to access 30 hours free childcare' (17/10/2017)

More than 20,000 eligible parents are yet to claim the extended 30 hours of free childcare, more than six weeks after the flagship government initiative launched, it has emerged. Figures published by the Department for Education show that 195,345 out of 216,384 30 hours funded childcare eligibility codes issued so far have now been validated - equivalent to 90 per cent - leaving 21,039 codes that are yet to be validated. Until parents' applications are verified by their local authority or childcare provider they cannot use the entitlement.

Full story: Children and Young People Now

TES

Prevent duty should guard against dangers of authoritarianism, academic says (17/10/2017)

The Prevent duty should not just protect pupils from radicalisation by terrorists – it should also guard against the dangers of authoritarian leaders in the west, an academic has said. But, he adds, it may be hard to convince Brexit voters of the merits of these types of British values.Prevent should be revised so that pupils are made aware of the ascent of autocratic leaders around the world, who are endangering fundamental values, such as respect for democracy and the rule of law, according to Randall Curren, professor of philosophy at the University of Rochester, in New York state.

Full story: TES

TES

Exam pressures fuel rise in Childline calls about mental health (17/10/2017)

Exam pressures have contributed to a near tripling in the proportion of Childline callers whose main concerns relate to their mental wellbeing. Childline's annual review reveals that more than a fifth – 22 per cent – of the almost 300,000 young people whom it counselled in 2016-2017 were primarily concerned about their mental and emotional health. This was an increase from 8 per cent in 2015-2016. Speaking to Tes at yesterday’s Childline Annual Review launch, NSPCC chief executive Peter Wanless said: “These issues reflect the pressure to conform and do well in exams.”

Full story: TES

TES

Five myths about autism we need to banish from teaching (17/10/2017)

Thankfully, the past few years have brought about greater awareness of hidden disabilities. This includes autistic spectrum disorder (ASD) or, perhaps more appropriately, autistic spectrum condition (ASC). However, greater awareness of ASC has not come with increased clarity: several myths about ASC still prevail. That can be very damaging in schools; in this blog, I aim to do my best to bring some clarity for teachers.

Full story: TES

TES

Two-thirds of teens want more online safety support (16/10/2017)

More than two-thirds of teenagers would like schools to provide more support on online safety issues such as cyber-bullying, new research suggests. And more than three-fifths (63 per cent) want their school to offer more peer-led education programmes on how to use social media safely, a survey from youth research agency has revealed. The ResearchBods poll, of 1,000 13- to 17-year-olds, found that teenagers are much more likely to confide in a peer (72 per cent) than a teacher (34 per cent) when they experience online bullying.

Full story: TES