Daily Mail

Half of paedophiles convicted of grooming children for sex online are let off jail by 'lenient' judges (06/01/2018)

Nearly half of paedophiles found guilty of grooming a child online before trying to meet them for sex are let off jail by 'lenient' judges, new figures show. Criminals who have been spared time behind bars include a 56-year-old man who attempted to meet who he thought was a 15-year-old girl for sex before being arrested by police, who then found 1,673 indecent images of children at his home.

Full story: Daily Mail

CEOP

More students found cheating in GCSE and A-level exams (05/01/2018)

More students are cheating in GCSE and A-level exams in England, with the number caught last summer up a quarter on the previous year, new figures show. Exam boards issued 2,715 penalties to students for malpractice in 2017 against 2,180 in 2016, Ofqual said. Most were penalised for taking mobile phones into the exam, while just under a fifth were pulled up for plagiarism. The rise in cheating came as new tougher GCSEs in English and maths were introduced for the first time.

Full story: BBC

CYP Now

Serious case review calls for changes to domestic abuse procedures (05/01/2018)

A serious case review into the murder of a toddler by his violent stepfather has called for improvements in the way councils assess the risk of domestic abuse to children. Wolverhampton Safeguarding Children Board conducted the review following the death of two-year-old Jeremiah Regis-Ngaujah, who died from multiple injuries in November 2016 caused by a number of attacks by his mother's partner Chavaze McGregor, 27. McGregor, who was jailed for life in June for the murder of the toddler, is described in the review as being a violent man who, through his Christian faith, believed that boys should be subjected to physical chastisement.

Full story: Children and Young People Now

Daily Mail

Social media sites are ordered to crack down on underage users (05/01/2018)

A watchdog has warned Facebook, Twitter and Snapchat to tighten up their age controls and clamp down on underage users. The Information Commissioner's Office stepped in after it emerged that the social media platforms were letting millions of British children on to the platform before they were 13. New ICO guidelines state that social media giants must examine whether they put children at risk – by showing minors adverts for alcohol or gambling, for example.

Full story: Daily Mail

Daily Mail

Waitrose bans sale of high-caffeine energy drinks to children under 16 following teachers' warnings that they fuel disruption in the classroom (04/01/2018)

Children under 16 are to be banned from buying high-caffeine energy drinks at Waitrose. It follows warnings from teachers that the drinks fuel disruptive behaviour and risk taking. The leading supermarket’s ban applies to energy drinks containing more than 150mg of caffeine per litre. These drinks carry health warnings which read: ‘High caffeine content. Not recommended for children or pregnant or breastfeeding women or persons sensitive to caffeine.’

Full story: Daily Mail

Daily Mail

The children aged ten who are addicted to social media (04/01/2018)

Children as young as ten are becoming dependent on social media for their sense of self-worth, a major study warned. It found many youngsters now measure their status by how much public approval they get online, often through ‘likes’.
Some change their behaviour in real life to boost their image on the web. The report into youngsters aged from eight to 12 was carried out by Children’s Commissioner Anne Longfield.

Full story: Daily Mail

Guardian

Secondary school pupils 'ill-equipped to cope' with stress of social media (04/01/2018)

Children moving from primary to secondary school are ill-equipped to deal with the onslaught of social media which takes on an increasingly important role in their lives, exposing them to significant emotional risk, a report says. Although primary schools are teaching about online safety effectively, the children’s commissioner for England says pupils are not being adequately prepared for the emotional challenges that social media presents as they move to senior school.

Full story: Guardian

CEOP

Schools 'should help children with social media risk' (04/01/2018)

Schools should play a bigger role in preparing children for social media's emotional demands as they move from primary to secondary school, England's children's commissioner says. Anne Longfield said she was worried many pupils at that stage became anxious about their identity and craved likes and comments for validation. Her study said children aged eight to 12 found it hard to manage the impact.

Full story: BBC

TES

Social media 'cliff-edge': Nine ways for schools to help pupils cope (04/01/2018)

The children's commissioner has called on schools to offer pupils effective digital-literacy lessons. Here is what they can do
In a report published today, the children’s commissioner has said that pupils are starting secondary school unprepared for a social-media “cliff edge” that causes their world to "explode". Anne Longfield calls on schools should teach digital literacy and online resilience to pupils.

Full story: TES

TES

Twelve things we learned today about pupils' use of social media (04/01/2018)

A new report, by the children's commissioner, reveals that pupils are on social media up to 18 hours a day...but are aware that it can be addictive. In a new report, children’s commissioner Anne Longfield spoke to pupils between the ages of 8 and 12 about their use of social media.

Full story: TES

CEOP

Secondary school starters 'unprepared' for social media (Video) (04/01/2018)

England's children's commissioner says students face a big change in how social media is used when they move to secondary school.

Full story: BBC

CYP Now

Child-on-parent abuse programme to expand across London (04/01/2018)

One of the few programmes that addresses child-on-parent violence committed by 11- to 18-year-olds is to expand across London after securing additional funding. The Domestic Violence Intervention Project's Yuva programme uses group and one-to-one sessions with parents and adolescents to try to reduce child-on-parent abuse by encouraging behavioural change. The charity's programme has been operating in some parts of London but is now set to be offered in more areas of the capital thanks to a three-year grant of £103,800 from the City of London Corporation's City Bridge Trust.

Full story: Children and Young People Now

CYP Now

Longfield calls for schools to help children combat social media pressures (04/01/2018)

Schools need to do more to prepare pupils for the emotional pressures and demands of social media, the children's commissioner for England has said. A report published today by children's commissioner Anne Longfield found that children's use of social media increases rapidly after they enter secondary school, with them often using social media multiple times a day.

Full story: Children and Young People Now

TES

Thousands of pupils 'denied mental health treatment' (03/01/2018)

New figures show that around 18,000 referrals to child and adolescent mental health services in Scotland have been rejected over the past three years. Questions are being raised as new figures show thousands of pupils are being denied mental health treatment. Almost 18,000 referrals for child and adolescent mental health services (CAMHS) – the vast majority of which are made by health professionals – have been rejected in Scotland since the SNP government established an 18-week waiting time target for treatment, new research by Scottish Labour reveals.

Full story: TES

CYP Now

Social workers criticise 'regressive' changes to child protection arrangements (03/01/2018)

Social work leaders have branded government plans to overhaul local child safeguarding arrangements as "regressive and negative". Government proposals to abolish local safeguarding children boards (LSCBs) and replace them with a new system of local multi-agency arrangements, involving councils, police and the health service, were announced last October.
In order to pave the way for this, a number of changes to statutory Working Together guidance have been put forward. But, responding to a consultation on these, the British Association of Social Workers (BASW) has warned that the proposals will undermine, rather than improve, local efforts to improve safeguarding.

Full story: Children and Young People Now