CEOP

Girls 'better at co-operating on problems' (21/11/2017)

When young people study or take exams the results are usually about rewarding their individual achievement. But when they get into the workplace they will be told about the importance of social skills and the need to co-operate with other people on solving problems. So are school systems out of step with what is needed by young people? PISA, which compares students' abilities in reading, maths and science, has now carried out the world's first global tests on collaborative problem-solving skills.

Full story: BBC

Guardian

‘Working-class children get less of everything in education - including respect’ (21/11/2017)

When Diane Reay, Cambridge University professor of education, started researching her book about working class children’s experiences of education, she had no idea just how much inequality she would uncover in state schools today. “The most important thing I found out was that we are still educating different social classes for different functions in society.” She expected to find the English state system was providing roughly the same education for all. “But it doesn’t. Even within a comprehensive school, when they’re all in the same building, the working classes are still getting less education than the middle classes, just as they had when my dad was at school at the beginning of the 20th century.”

Full story: Guardian

Guardian

Family courts are a revolving door for too many parents (20/11/2017)

How do we upgrade the family justice system so that it disrupts patterns of family violence, drug abuse and mental distress, which blight children’s lives, at great human cost and expense to the taxpayer? These behaviours of violence, drug abuse and mental distress are passed down from generation to generation. They are amplified by traumatic childhoods, social isolation and social injustice. Standard care proceedings fail to address them.

Full story: Guardian

CYP Now

More than nine out of 10 schools set for budget cuts, warn unions (20/11/2017)

More than nine out of 10 schools will have seen their budgets cut by 2019/20, according to figures compiled by five unions. The figures show that 91 per cent or 17,942 schools will have seen or are due to experience a real-terms per pupil budget cut between 2015/16 and 2019/20. The calculations are based on Department for Education data and were made for the School Cuts website, which is operated by the GMB, the National Association of Head Teachers, the National Education Union, Unison and Unite.

Full story: Children and Young People Now

CYP Now

Institute for Youth Work 'seeks assurances' over government's commitment to young people (20/11/2017)

The Institute for Youth Work (IYW) has questioned how much civil society minister Tracey Crouch values youth work and young people, after it emerged that government plans for a new three-year youth policy statement have been dropped. In a strongly worded open letter sent to Crouch today, the IYW states that it is "seeking assurances about the value of young people and youth work to yourself and your department". The move follows Crouch's written statement to the House of Commons on Thursday announcing plans for a new civil society strategy that will feature youth work and social action.

Full story: Children and Young People Now

Fixers

Careful What You Click (20/11/2017)

A young man, who has landed a government agency job in cyber security, is hoping to protect vulnerable people against online scammers with a powerful film. Sefton Dosi, 22, from Brighton, is concerned that few people are aware of the dangers, particularly when sharing sensitive information over the Internet. Soon to start a cyber security apprenticeship at the Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency (MHRA), Sefton has teamed up with Fixers to promote online vigilance.

Full story: Fixers

Daily Mail

Girls' school head warns of rise of the 'screenager': Teacher says childhood is at risk of being eroded by the young's reliance on technology (20/11/2017)

Web giants should filter out pornography on smartphones to protect 'screenagers' from the 'wild west' of the internet, a leading headmistress has claimed. Charlotte Avery, president of the Girls' Schools Association (GSA) warned that modern childhood is in danger of being eroded by easy access to 'inappropriate' content online. While modern technology has made societies more 'widely connected' and 'better informed' than ever before, there is also a 'moral imperative' for web companies to tackle the 'dark side' of the internet.

Full story: Daily Mail

TES

Pupils at girls' schools 'more confident' to call out sexual harassment, says president (20/11/2017)

Girls who have attended single-sex schools are likely to have the confidence to "call out" sexual harassment, a leading headteacher has suggested. Charlotte Avery, who is also president of the Girls' Schools Association (GSA), said that there is no sense of such behaviour being "normalised" in girls' schools. Ms Avery, head of St Mary's School, Cambridge, was asked if she agreed that attending single-sex schools – and being spared unwanted attention from males – influences girls' confidence.

Full story: TES

Guardian

Lords push for new regulations to protect children online (18/11/2017)

Technology firms could be subjected to tough new regulations to protect the privacy and mental health of children as a result of a cross-party campaign that is likely to inflict a defeat on the government within weeks. An amendment from the crossbencher and film director Beeban Kidron to a bill going through the House of Lords has won the support of senior Tories, Labour and the Lib Dems. Its backers warn that teenagers are being bombarded by bespoke advertising and endless notifications and can routinely have their locations tracked by GPS. They say a barrage of information, based on data-gathering, is causing social anxieties, affecting the ability of young people to sleep and poses a risk of personal information being disseminated online.

Full story: Guardian

CEOP

UK seeks future cyber-security stars (18/11/2017)

A £20m initiative to get schoolchildren interested in cyber-security has been launched by the UK government. The Cyber Discovery programme is aimed at 15 to 18-year-olds and involves online and offline challenges themed around battling hackers. It is one of several programmes trying to build interest in security work and help fill a looming skills gap. One industry expert said a broad strategy would be needed to address the widening gap.

Full story: BBC

CEOP

How to teach children about abuse (17/11/2017)

'Share Some Secrets' is an animation which teaches children how to speak out about abuse. The video is based the book of the same name by author Christina Gabbitas. Speaking to BBC radio 5 live's Adrian Goldberg, Christina said she was keen to make a version that children can access without parental supervision, as "a lot of abuse happens in and around the home".

Full story: BBC

TES

Schools make autistic pupils feel isolated, report warns (17/11/2017)

Schools are inadvertently contributing to autistic pupils seeing themselves as 'different' to their classmates, say researchers . Negative experiences in mainstream schools have harmful long-term effects on pupils with autism spectrum conditions, a new study suggests. Researchers from the University of Surrey identified different ways in which schools contribute to autistic children seeing themselves as “different” to classmates in a negative way. For example, sensory sensitivity, which is a common characteristic of autism and can magnify sounds to an intolerable level, can lead to everyday classroom and playground noises being a source of anxiety and distraction.

Full story: TES

Guardian

NUS to investigate sexual harassment at universities (17/11/2017)

Sexual harassment in universities is to be investigated by the National Union of Students, which is conducting the UK’s first survey of staff sexual misconduct in higher education. Students will be asked whether they have experienced or witnessed sexual misconduct by staff and about their experience of reporting this behaviour to their institution. The research project is being carried out by the NUS women’s campaign. Researchers will consider professional boundaries and examine what types of behaviour students are comfortable dealing with from higher education staff.

Full story: Guardian

TES

Cash-strapped schools will run out of reserves by 2019, school business professionals warn (17/11/2017)

Funding cuts are resulting in schools having to reduce staff and increase class sizes, as well as appealing to parents for help. School reserves will have been used up in two years’ time, school business professionals have warned. About three-quarters of those taking part in a joint Tes survey with the National Association of School Business Management (NASBM) say that cash reserves will have run out by 2019. The survey results, released today, reveal how schools are trying to make ends meet and highlight a significant number turning to parents for help.

Full story: TES

CEOP

Germany bans children's smartwatches (17/11/2017)

A German regulator has banned the sale of smartwatches aimed at children, describing them as spying devices. It had previously banned an internet-connected doll called, My Friend Cayla, for similar reasons. Telecoms regulator the Federal Network Agency urged parents who had such watches to destroy them.

Full story: BBC

CYP Now

Government ditches youth policy statement (17/11/2017)

Plans for a new three-year youth policy statement have been dropped, although youth work will feature as part of a wider civil society strategy, it has emerged. The creation of a new youth policy statement to give "a clear narrative and vision" for how to help young people was first announced by former youth minister Rob Wilson last November but, nearly a year on, is still yet to be published. The Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS) has now confirmed that plans for a standalone youth policy statement have been dropped, with the issue of youth work and social action instead set to feature as part of wider civil society strategy announced by civil society minister Tracey Crouch.

Full story: Children and Young People Now

CEOP

The worst bullies: 'My friends called me Ugly Betty' (17/11/2017)

"Looking back, I think they were using me to make themselves feel better." Kiri Joliffe, now 19, suffered years of bullying at school from a group of girls she called friends. "One minute they liked you, the next they didn't." But when she complained, her teachers wouldn't take her seriously. It peaked when she was about 13, she says. But it never really let up for the whole time she was at school - and it centred on the way she looked.

Full story: BBC

CEOP

School counsellors needed to tackle self-harm 'epidemic', minister told (16/11/2017)

All young people in the UK should have access to school counsellors to tackle an "epidemic" in self-harm, the government has been been told. Baroness Walmsley said the problem was worse among young women and girls. But instead of hiring more counsellors, who could offer free and non-judgemental support, schools were having to sack them to save money. The government said it would shortly release "quite ambitious" proposals to improve young people's mental health.

Full story: BBC

CEOP

Cyber-bullying: Prince's 'stop, speak, support' code of conduct (16/11/2017)

Facebook and Snapchat are trialling a new, more direct way to help young people bullied online, following an intervention by Prince William. The social media platforms will help those in need of emotional support to access counsellors. The prince, together with tech firms, children's charities and parents, is also introducing the equivalent of a Green Cross Code for the internet. It tells young people to "stop, speak, support" when online. The aim is to encourage them to stop negative behaviour, tell a responsible adult and support victims of bullying.

Full story: BBC

CEOP

Autism concern over home schooling rise in Wales (16/11/2017)

The number of pupils being taken out of school to be taught at home has doubled in four years - with many of them believed to be autistic. Some 1,906 pupils were removed in 2016-17, up from 864 in 2013-14, according to council data. National Autistic Society Cymru said many were autistic children who were struggling to cope in school. The Welsh Government said it was committed to creating an inclusive education system for all learners.

Full story: BBC

CYP Now

Ministers urged to back full-time youth volunteering programme (16/11/2017)

Creating a national full-time youth volunteering programme similar to ones in the USA and France could boost the UK economy by up to £119m a year, a report commissioned by youth charity City Year UK has estimated. The report by Pro Bono Economics concluded that a programme that supported 10,000 young people to volunteer full-time the UK economy would gain £28m to £119m a year - equal to a return of £1.20 to £1.60 for every pound spent by government on the programme. On the back of the report, former Labour Education Secretary Lord Blunkett and City Year UK have called for government to fund a year-long programme and a legal status for full-time volunteers.

Full story: Children and Young People Now

Guardian

Law to change to make sex between coaches and 16- and 17-year-olds illegal (16/11/2017)

Changes to the law are set to make it illegal for sport coaches to have sex with 16- and 17-year-old children in their care in the wake of abuse and athlete welfare scandals across sport. The sports minister, Tracey Crouch, informed parliament that the Ministry of Justice had agreed changes to the law which would bring the sport industry into line with other sectors. It is illegal for teachers to sleep with pupils under the age of 18 and for care workers to have sex with 16- and 17-year-olds but at present the same strictures do not apply in sport.

Full story: Guardian

Stop Speak Support when you see online bullying (16/11/2017)

As part of The Royal Foundation’s Taskforce on the Prevention of Cyberbullying, a panel of young people have developed a campaign to encourage other young people to take three steps when you see bullying online.

Full story: Childnet

TES

An 'extra 50,000 pupils' eligible for free school meals under universal credit shake up (16/11/2017)

50,000 more pupils could get free school meals under government plans to change eligibility criteria as it introduces universal credit. In a consultation launched today, ministers say that currently “some of the most disadvantaged low-income households do not qualify for free school meals”. To address this, they plan to base the eligibility on each household’s net earnings, rather than the number of hours worked, as at present. These net earnings would not include additional income from benefits.

Full story: TES

CEOP

'Vulnerable children have to reach crisis to get help' (15/11/2017)

Children facing abuse and neglect in England increasingly get help from local councils only when their problems reach a crisis, say leading charities. Services which intervene early to help families in difficulties are bearing the brunt of cuts, says their report. Relying on crisis intervention incurs a "devastating cost" both socially and financially, they add. The government says that providing help as early as possible is the best way to keep children safe.

Full story: BBC

Advice for Professionals this Anti-Bullying Week (15/11/2017)

Kat Tremlett, a practitioner on the Professionals Online Safety Helpline (POSH), gives her advice for professionals who are concerned about cyberbullying this Anti-Bullying Week. The POSH Helpline can help professionals working with children with any online safety issues, including - privacy, online reputation, gaming, grooming, cyberbullying, sexting, inappropriate behaviour on social media and so on.

Full story: Childnet

CYP Now

Youth select committee calls for action on body image issues (15/11/2017)

Young politicians are calling on the government to take action to combat the "long-lasting" effect of body dissatisfaction on young people's lives. Recommendations made by the British Youth Council's youth select committee include funding for schools to support pupils' emotional wellbeing, including issues related to body dissatisfaction. Body image issues should also be included in personal, social, health, and economic education (PSHE) classes and the government is also being asked to sponsor an annual "national body confidence week" to raise issues around body image, health and fitness.

Full story: Children and Young People Now

Community Care

Domestic abuse: why we need alternatives to incident-led responses (15/11/2017)

The September Joint Targeted Area Inspection (JTAI) report of the response to children living with domestic abuse clearly demonstrates that much has been achieved to support children and young people that are affected by domestic abuse. Despite this, the report says “it is time for the system to evolve”. There are clear themes that run through the report.

Full story: Community Care

Community Care

Children’s social care experts to lead ‘care crisis review’ (15/11/2017)

A group of children’s social care experts will lead a seven-month review into the “care crisis” causing record levels of care proceedings and numbers of children in care. The review, funded by the Nuffield Foundation, will aim to identify changes that could be made to local authority and court systems, as well as national and local policies and practices to stem the increase of care cases and children in the care system. Participants include the president of the family courts, Sir James Munby; the chief executive of Cafcass, Anthony Douglas; the president of the Association of Directors of Children’s Services (ADCS), Alison Michalska; the children’s commissioner for England, Anne Longfield; and assorted academics, directors of children’s services and policy advisers.

Full story: Community Care

Guardian

Charities warn of 'devastating cost' of cuts to children's services (15/11/2017)

Local authority children’s services are being reduced to crisis-driven firefighting as a result of “crippling” central government funding cuts, according to a report. Three leading children’s charities are warning that early intervention services, designed to prevent problems escalating and children suffering a crisis, have been hardest hit by budget cuts. As a result, councils can only afford to get involved when children have already reached crisis point, which may then result in more costly interventions such as being taken into care, the charities say.

Full story: Guardian

NSPCC

Rise in non-recent sex offences recorded against children (15/11/2017)

More than 60,000 cases of non-recent sexual abuse against children have been recorded by police forces across the UK over the last 4 years. Figures show that recorded offences involving non-recent sexual abuse – where the offence is alleged to have occurred more than a year before it was reported to police – have increased year on year, from 10,493 in 2013/14 to 20,410 in 2016/17. We believe this steep rise may, in part, be down to high-profile abuse cases as well as the football abuse scandal, which began a year ago this week. A dedicated NSPCC helpline was set up in response, and received more than 2,500 calls.

Full story: NSPCC

CEOP

Flagship tax-free childcare scheme delayed (15/11/2017)

Plans for the full rollout of tax-free childcare in the UK have been delayed until March 2018 - five years after it was first announced. It comes after parents grappled with technical difficulties on the official website, launched in April, they need to use to access the scheme. In a written statement, ministers said they would be staggering applications by age of child between now and March. All parents were supposed to be able to join the scheme by the end of 2017. Under the scheme, the government will put in 20p for every 80p parents pay in childcare, up to the value of £2,000 a year.

Full story: BBC

Guardian

Strangers can talk to your child through 'connected' toys, investigation finds (14/11/2017)

A consumer group is urging major retailers to withdraw a number of “connected” or “intelligent” toys likely to be popular at Christmas, after finding security failures that it warns could put children’s safety at risk. Tests carried out by Which? with the German consumer group Stiftung Warentest, and other security research experts, found flaws in Bluetooth and wifi-enabled toys that could enable a stranger to talk to a child. The investigation found that four out of seven of the tested toys could be used to communicate with the children playing with them. Security failures were discovered in the Furby Connect, i-Que Intelligent Robot, Toy-Fi Teddy and CloudPets.

Full story: Guardian

CYP Now

Major review to investigate rising numbers of children in care (14/11/2017)

A coalition of children's services directors, academics, charities and legal experts has launched a review into the rise in care applications and numbers of children being taken into care. The seven-month long review launches this week and will investigate the reasons for the recent rises as well as the impact of national government policy on local children in care trends. This will include welfare changes as well as funding for early intervention support for vulnerable families. In addition, it will look to highlight areas that have successfully addressed a rise in care applications to see what other areas can learn from them.

Full story: Children and Young People Now

CEOP

Heads complain of having to ask parents for school funds (14/11/2017)

Head teachers representing more than 5,000 schools across England are supporting a protest letter to the chancellor over "inadequate" funding. The letter, being delivered to Downing Street, warns of schools increasingly having to make "desperate requests to parents for 'voluntary' donations". Heads are calling for an extra £1.7bn per year for schools. The government has already moved £1.3bn of education funding directly into school budgets.

Full story: BBC

TES

Late teacher's book republished to raise awareness of mental health (14/11/2017)

Last year, teacher and author Jonny Zucker took his own life after living with depression for more than two decades. In early October, to commemorate his life and to raise awareness of mental health issues in adults and children, education software company 2Simple republished his popular novel Striker Boy. All proceeds will go directly to his family and to the mental health charity Mind. And today, to support the release of the book, 2Simple are launching a range of free teacher resource packs for schools, including "emotional resilience" resources designed to stimulate and support discussion on promote positive mental health.

Full story: TES

CEOP

Connected toys have ‘worrying’ security issues (14/11/2017)

Consumer watchdog Which? has called on retailers to stop selling some popular toys it says have "proven" security issues. Those toys include Furby Connect, the i-Que robot, Cloudpets and Toy-fi Teddy. Which? found that there was no authentication required between the toys and the devices they could link with via Bluetooth. Two of the manufacturers said they took security very seriously.

Full story: BBC

TES

Police produce first-ever lesson plans on how to survive a terror attack (14/11/2017)

Advice for pupils on how to survive terrorist gun and knife attacks is to be made available to schools across the country for the first time. The lesson plans for key stage 3 and 4 pupils have been produced by the National Counter Terrorism Security Office (NaCTSO) and the PSHE Association, and are backed by the Department for Education. The materials are an extension of the government’s Run, Hide, Tell campaign and address the threat of terrorist attacks in crowded places. They are based around a six-minute film called Run, Hide, Tell - The Story Of Nur, Edih and Llet. The film follows the story of three young people reflecting on how they managed to survive an attack on a shopping centre.

Full story: TES

CYP Now

Government launches early years healthy eating drive (13/11/2017)

Example menus and recipes have been published by government as part of efforts to encourage early years settings to provide healthy meals for young children. The resources, jointly developed by the Department for Education, the Department of Health and Public Health England, are designed to offer food and drink in line with current government dietary recommendations for infants and children aged six months to four years old. They include example menus and useful information for early years settings to help show how they can meet the Early Years Foundation Stage welfare requirement to provide "healthy, balanced and nutritious" meals for children.

Full story: Children and Young People Now

CYP Now

Former ADCS president takes charge of residential care reforms (13/11/2017)

Former Association of Directors of Children's Services president Alan Wood is to chair the new Residential Care Leadership Board, the Department for Education has announced. The board was created to lead on the delivery of the changes to residential children's care in England that were recommended in Sir Martin Narey's 2016 review of the sector. Changes the board will oversee include encouraging local authorities to reduce the cost of children's home placements by working together on commissioning, and ensuring that best practice in residential childcare is shared and put into practice.

Full story: Children and Young People Now

Community Care

Working Together changes: what social workers need to know (13/11/2017)

The government is consulting on changes to the Working Together to Safeguard Children guidance. The wide-ranging guidance sets out the requirements individual services have to promote the welfare of children, and how different agencies should work together to achieve that. The consultation ends on 31 December and a new draft of the guidance will be finalised next year, replacing the current edition published in 2015. Most of the updates in the guidance relate to changes around local safeguarding children’s boards (LSCBs) and serious case reviews brought in by the Children and Social Work Act 2017, but there also others of relevance to social workers.

Full story: Community Care

Community Care

Proposed change to Working Together guidance could leave social workers ‘exposed’ (13/11/2017)

A minor change to the wording of the Working Together to Safeguard Children guidance could leave social workers “exposed”, it has been claimed. In Annex C of its consultation on changing the guidance which underpins how local authorities and partner agencies must act to protect children, the government has proposed deleting the phrase “with their managers” from the section of the guidance outlining how to carry out assessments. This deletion would mean the onus is on social workers, rather than social workers and their manager, to decide at what speed an assessment is carried out following a child’s case being referred to local authority social care.

Full story: Community Care

Guardian

Counselling for cyberbullying has doubled in five years – children's charity (13/11/2017)

The number of children receiving counselling over cyberbullying has more than doubled in five years, prompting the NSPCC to call on ministers to put pressure on social media sites to do more to protect children from online abuse. Children as young as nine have contacted the NSPCC’s Childline complaining of being tormented by name-calling, blackmail and death threats posted publicly on social media profiles and blogs. Others have complained of rumours being spread about them online. One boy told Childline: “I’m being bullied on social media by people who call me fat and ugly. I can’t block them because then they’ll just bully me even more at school. I don’t want to talk to my teachers about it, I just feel like giving up. I’ve been self-harming to cope but I just want to stop feeling this way.”

Full story: Guardian

TES

More than 60 per cent of UK school staff have witnessed racist bullying (13/11/2017)

Sixty-one per cent of school staff have seen bullying related to racism, according to a new survey. A poll by the Diana Award, for Anti-Bullying Week, which starts on Monday, also found over half of young people have experienced bullying at school. The charity surveyed 1,593 young people and 273 teachers and support staff in schools across the UK. It found that 63 per cent of young people have experienced bullying at school.

Full story: TES

Guardian

Virtual reality lets adults see neglect and abuse through a child's eyes (13/11/2017)

A new virtual reality (VR) film gives adopters and foster carers the chance to put themselves in the shoes of a child in care. It is one of a pair of new films created by the Cornerstone Partnership, a social enterprise working to improve the life chances of children in care, to recruit and train adopters and foster carers. One film, which will be used in training programmes for adopters and foster carers, allows users to experience the realities of being a child in care. From the viewpoint of a baby in the womb and then of a toddler, users are placed in the role of a victim of neglect and abuse, and see the impact of these experiences on the brain and how they can influence behaviour later in life. They also observe a conversation between a child and a foster carer and different ways to approach challenging behaviour.

Full story: Guardian

NSPCC

Childline counselling for cyberbullying continues to rise (13/11/2017)

5,103 counselling sessions about cyberbullying were held by Childline in 2016/17 – a 12% increase from the previous year. Sessions have more than doubled since cyberbullying was first recorded as a specific issue 5 years ago. Children have told counsellors about name-calling, spreading rumours, death threats and blackmail posted publicly on social media profiles, blogs and online pictures.

Full story: NSPCC

CEOP

Dyslexic students 'discriminated against' in allowance assessments (13/11/2017)

Assessments for dyslexic students claiming disability allowances should be reviewed, peers have said. The issue was raised by Lord Addington, who is president of the British Dyslexia Association. He said it was unfair dyslexic students had to pay up to £600 to have their condition reassessed to claim the disabled students' allowance at university. Education Minister Lord Agnew agreed the system should be reviewed. Disabled university students can claim an allowance to cover extra costs because of their illness such as specialist equipment or a non-medical helper.

Full story: BBC

Daily Mail

Teachers are told to allow primary school pupils to switch gender WITHOUT getting their parents' consent (12/11/2017)

Teachers should allow primary school children to change their gender in school without seeking parents' consent, the Scottish government has said. Parents who voice concerns about their children sharing a changing room or toilet with transgender children will be explained about the 'ethos of inclusion' by school staff under the new guidelines. School staff have also been given the green light to inform local authorities about parents who 'struggle' with their child's transgender identity. The official guidelines, produced by LGBT Youth Scotland, tells teachers 'not to deny' trans children's identity 'or overly question their understanding of their gender identity'.

Full story: Daily Mail

TES

Pupils should be allowed to explore their sexuality, says Church of England (12/11/2017)

New guidance has been issued to Church of England schools on how to deal with bullying over gender and sexuality. Children should be able to try out "the many cloaks of identity" without being labelled or bullied, the Church of England has said. In new advice issued to its schools, the Church said youngsters should be free to "explore the possibilities of who they might be". Nursery and primary school in particular is a time of "creative exploration", it says, and youngsters should be able to choose to dress up as a princess or a fireman "without expectation or comment".

Full story: TES

CEOP

School exclusion 'the ultimate rejection' for adopted kids (11/11/2017)

"Being permanently excluded was the ultimate rejection for him," says Faye, mother of 15-year-old Joe. Faye says since he was excluded from secondary school, Joe's behaviour has deteriorated, with a devastating knock-on effect for the rest of the family. But this family's experience is not unusual, according to a report by the charity Adoption UK. Its research estimates adopted children can be up to 20 times more likely to be permanently excluded than their peers.

Full story: BBC

TES

‘Adopted children twenty times more likely to be excluded’ (11/11/2017)

Adopted children are around 20 times more likely to be permanently excluded from school than their classmates, a new survey has found. Nearly a quarter of adopted children have been temporarily excluded from school, according to the survey by Adoption UK. The charity’s survey, which was responded to by more than 2,000 adoptive parents, found that 1.63 per cent of adopted children were permanently excluded in 2015-16 – 20 times higher than the rate for the overall pupil population (0.08 per cent).

Full story: TES

CEOP

Did you know you should give under-fives vitamin tablets? (11/11/2017)

Children between the age of six months and five years should take vitamin A, C and D supplements, government advice says - do you find this surprising? If you do, it seems you're not alone. Researchers in Wales found only 30% of parents and carers said they had ever been given advice by a health professional about giving young children vitamin supplements and nearly two-thirds (64%) of those asked said they didn't give their children vitamin supplements. The Department for Health (DoH) recommends all children aged six months to five years should be given supplements containing vitamins A, C and D every day.

Full story: BBC

National Autistic Society welcomes new report on residential special schools (11/11/2017)

The National Autistic Society welcomes the publication this week of ‘Good intentions, good enough?’, a review commissioned by the Government of the experiences and outcomes of children and young people in residential special schools and colleges. The review was carried out by Dame Christine Lenehan, who is Director of the Council for Disabled Children. Many of the 6,000 children and young people who attend residential schools and colleges in England are on the autism spectrum. These are often young people with the highest level of needs, with communication difficulties, anxiety and sensory differences. Residential schools can provide a very beneficial environment for some children on the autism spectrum. This is because children do not all live near the type of specialist school that may suit them best. Further, some children have needs that can be met most effectively in a school setting that supports them 24 hours a day.

Full story: National Autistic Society

NSPCC

Over 100,000 children rejected for mental health treatment (10/11/2017)

More than 100,000 children referred to local specialist NHS mental health services have been rejected for treatment in the last 2 years. New figures obtained from NHS Trusts in England confirm that from a total of 652,023 cases referred to Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMHS), 109,613 children were turned away – equivalent to an average of 150 a day. The number could be significantly higher, as one in five Trusts which responded to the request failed to report the number of rejected referrals. The charity is now calling on Government to shift the focus of children and young people’s mental health services towards early intervention, to ensure that young people’s mental health does not have to reach crisis point before they are able to get help.

Full story: NSPCC

TES

Third of children say teachers do not talk enough about bullying (10/11/2017)

More than a third of children feel their teachers do not talk enough about what to do if they are bullied at school, a new poll suggests. And yet almost two-thirds (64 per cent) of children have come across someone being bullied because they were different, according to the survey. The poll, of more than 1,500 children in England, found that over half worry about being seen as "different" from others and two-fifths would hide aspects of themselves for fear of being bullied.

Full story: TES

CYP Now

DfE 'making progress' on mental health check pilots (10/11/2017)

The government remains committed to trials of mental health assessments for children entering the care system that were due to launch six months ago, a Department for Education official has said. Up to 10 pilot areas were set to start testing mental health assessments for looked-after children by May. But in April it emerged that the pilots had been placed on hold due to the snap general election. Speaking at a House of Lords event this week, Helen White, a DfE policy adviser, said the government remains committed to testing the idea.

Full story: Children and Young People Now

Independent

Police face legal challenge over refusing to delete teenage boy's details for 'sexting' (10/11/2017)

A teenage boy whose details were recorded by police for “sexting” is launching a legal challenge to have them deleted. In the first case of its kind, representatives of the boy known only as CL, have won the right for a judicial review into Greater Manchester Police’s (GMP) actions. The force put the boy’s details on its system over an incident in 2015, when he was 14 years old.

Full story: Independent

TES

'1 in 5 teachers aware of illegal SEND exclusions' (09/11/2017)

One in five teachers are aware of illegal exclusions of students with special educational needs and disabilities (SEND) within their educational setting, according to interim survey findings. The NEU teaching union surveyed members on SEND provision in schools – and interim findings from the survey were shared at a Westminster Education Forum event in London today. According to a slide shown at the event, 20 per cent of respondents to the poll were "aware of illegal exclusions within their setting".

Full story: TES

CYP Now

National board for children with high-level SEND to launch (09/11/2017)

A national leadership board to oversee reform of the education and care of children and young people with high-level special educational needs and disabilities (SEND) is to be created following a review of residential special schools and colleges. The board will take forward the recommendations of the Good Intentions, Good Enough? review, which called for significant changes in how children with the highest-level SEND are supported and educated in England.

Full story: Children and Young People Now

TES

Prevent: Anti-terror referrals most likely to come from education sector (09/11/2017)

More people have been referred to Prevent – the government’s controversial anti-terror programme – by the education sector, than by the police. Home Office statistics out today show that there were 2,539 referrals to the Prevent programme by the education sector from April 2015 to March 2016 – a third of all referrals made. This comes after the Prevent duty – which legally requires schools to “prevent young people from being drawn into terrorism" – was introduced in July 2015.

Full story: TES

CYP Now

Rise in number of care leavers not in work or education (08/11/2017)

The number of care leavers who are not in education, employment or training (Neet) has increased over the last four years, government figures have revealed. Department for Education data released by children's minister Robert Goodwill reveals that between 2014 and 2017 there were around 600 more 19- to 21-year-old care leavers classed as Neet. The figures, which were revealed in response to a parliamentary question by Labour MP Ian Austin, show there were 10,870 19- to 21-year-old Neet care leavers at the end of March 2017, compared with 10,250 at the end of March 2014 - a rise of six per cent.

Full story: Children and Young People Now

Guardian

Charities criticise foster care exclusion from free childcare policy (08/11/2017)

The exclusion of fostered children from the additional 15 hours of free childcare a week available to parents in England is discriminatory and inexplicable, charities have said. The government’s flagship childcare policy, which takes the potential number of free hours for parents of three- and four-year-olds up to 30 in total, was introduced in September but contained a specific exclusion “if the child is your foster child”. Thirteen charities, including Action for Children, Become, the British Association of Social Workers,and the Care Leavers’ Association, have denounced the prohibition and are demanding that it be removed.

Full story: Guardian

CEOP

The families living in modern day slums (07/11/2017)

Poor children are being crammed into slum-land bedsits, some of which are so risky that some families end up being referred to social services for help, charities say. Whole families are living in single rooms in shared properties, where strangers are coming and going. Some are renting from private landlords, while others - recently made homeless - are placed in temporary accommodation by local councils, trying to meet their obligations amid the housing crisis. "Call it a slum, call it what you like," says Kim Steward, an outreach worker with charity School-Home Support, "lots of families live like this and it's not safe."

Full story: BBC

CEOP

'Tubby and terrified': How fear puts girls off PE (07/11/2017)

"I was on the tubby side. My personal self-consciousness was like a devil on my shoulder telling me I couldn't do it. It was the fact that I had to move, be active and sweat. I would just stand and watch and mope." Gracie says she had zero self-confidence when she started secondary school. She was so nervous that she tried to persuade her mum she was sick most days and twice-weekly PE lessons were a particular source of stress. Hayley Wood-Thompson, Gracie's PE teacher at The John Warner School in Hertfordshire, says about half of the girls feel the same.

Full story: BBC

CYP Now

One in 10 children 'damaged' by parental alcohol abuse (07/11/2017)

The lives of an estimated 700,000 young people are being damaged because they live with a parent who abuses alcohol, a charity survey has warned. Of 3,000 parents or carers of young people aged between 10 and 17 surveyed by The Children's Society, 12 per cent reported that health professionals or family members were concerned about their drinking or had advised them to cut down over the last five years. This equates to the parents or carers of 700,000 children if applied to the UK population, according to the charity. Of these, the same parent also suffered from depression or anxiety in 59 per cent of cases and 39 per cent of young people had experienced domestic violence.

Full story: Children and Young People Now

Guardian

YouTube accused of 'violence' against young children over kids' content (07/11/2017)

YouTube has been accused of “infrastructural violence” against children due to its role in the creation of vast quantities of low-quality, disturbing content aimed at pre-schoolers. James Bridle, a campaigning technology-focused artist and writer, documented the way the video platform’s algorithmic curation drives enormous amounts of viewers to content made purely to satisfy those algorithms as closely as possible.

Full story: Guardian

CEOP

I got separated from my siblings, care girl tells MPs (07/11/2017)

"I got separated from my siblings... I was told I was moved away from them because I was overprotective with them," 17-year-old Rachel told a committee of MPs on Tuesday. She had come to Westminster to share her experiences of being in foster care, as part of the Education Committee's inquiry into fostering. The MPs heard youngsters in care wanted more support to keep in touch with siblings and former friends, as well as more information about the foster families with whom they are placed. Rachel told MPs it was very important to keep siblings together and when she looked back on her situation, she wondered if it could have been dealt with differently.

Full story: BBC

Guardian

Rise in 'dark and troubling' sexual offences by children sparks concern (07/11/2017)

A rise in “dark and very troubling” sexual offences among children, including the recent conviction of an 11-year-old rapist, has sparked concerns among justice ministers. Youth justice minister, Dr Phillip Lee, told MPs on Tuesday that the “uptick” in sexual offences among children was troubling enough for the ministry of justice to consider setting up a special unit in the youth custody estate to tackle the problem.

Full story: Guardian

Daily Mail

Shielding children from sexual abuse is a moral duty, online giants are told: Home Secretary Amber Rudd demands firms go 'further and faster' (06/11/2017)

Home Secretary Amber Rudd has told social media giants they have a ‘moral duty’ to protect children from online abuse, amid proposals to ban under-13s from Facebook and Twitter. She urged technology firms to ‘go further and faster’ in the fight against child sexual exploitation, warning that ‘vile’ content is now ‘vastly’ easier to find. Following an ‘exponential surge’ in the volume of indecent images online, she will meet representatives of Google, Facebook and Microsoft in the US this week in a bid to ‘turn the tide on this horrendous scourge’.

Full story: Daily Mail

Guardian

Police report sharp rise in sexting cases involving children in England and Wales (06/11/2017)

The number of sexting cases involving children has more than doubled in two years, police figures have suggested, leading a senior officer to warn about deficiencies in proper sex education. Simon Bailey, the National Police Chiefs Council’s lead officer on child protection also raised concerns about extreme pornography being shared among young people, and social media sites acting quickly to take down such material. He spoke as police forces in England and Wales released data on Monday showing they registered 6,238 sexting offences in 2016/17 – a rate of 17 every day. That represented an increase of a third on the tally of 4,681 in the previous year and of 131% on 2014/15, when 2,700 cases were logged.

Full story: Guardian

CYP Now

Experts urge training drive to boost mental health support for children in care (06/11/2017)

All carers and professionals who work directly with looked-after children should receive mental health training as part of a range of efforts to boost support for them, a government-appointed group of experts has recommended. The expert group, which was set up last year by the Department of Health and Department for Education to improve mental health support for children in care, said those working closely with looked-after children, including foster carers, children's home staff and special guardians, often lack training to support their often complex mental health needs.

Full story: Children and Young People Now

CEOP

'Speed up mental health support for children in care' (06/11/2017)

"It felt like no-one was there for me and no-one cared - I was crying myself to sleep every night." This is what life was like for Callum after he was taken into care aged 13 in 2008, following the death of his father and a family breakdown. He told the BBC's Victoria Derbyshire programme his mental health quickly deteriorated. "I was still an emotional kid trying to get over Dad, and everything got on top of me. He was my superhero." Almost half of those in the care system have a diagnosable mental health disorder, according to statutory guidance published in 2015.

Full story: BBC

CEOP

Police investigate 17 child sexting cases a day (06/11/2017)

Police investigations into children sharing sexual images of themselves and others have more than doubled in two years, figures have shown. Forces in England and Wales recorded 6,238 underage "sexting" offences in 2016-17, a rate of 17 a day. Police said they received reports from children as young as 10. Chief Constable Simon Bailey, the National Police Chiefs' Council lead for child protection, said: "There is a worrying upward trend." He added social networks needed to remove indecent images more quickly.

Full story: BBC

TES

Residential special schools are 'isolated' and lack ambition, review says (06/11/2017)

Vulnerable children with special educational needs are being let down by residential special schools that are “professionally isolated” and lack ambition, an independent review has found. Some residential special schools focus on wellbeing and therapeutic support of their pupils at the expense of educational progress, according to a review of residential special schools and colleges. And adversarial relationships between local authorities (LAs) and providers leave young people “caught in the middle” and can cause delays in them receiving the right support, it found.

Full story: TES

Residential special schools and colleges: support for children (06/11/2017)

An independent review of the experiences and outcomes of children in residential special schools and colleges, and government response. This report by Dame Christine Lenehan and Mark Geraghty sets out how children and young people with special educational needs and disability (SEND) are currently supported in residential special schools and colleges and recommendations to support children, young people and their families to improve their experiences and outcomes

Full story: Department for Education

Guardian

Families of child sexual abuse victims threaten action against UK government (04/11/2017)

Lawyers acting for families whose children have been victims of rape, sexual assault and harassment by fellow school pupils have stepped up action against the education secretary, Justine Greening, with a letter threatening judicial review proceedings. The Equality and Human Rights Commission is funding a legal challenge against the education secretary, which accuses her of failing to act to protect children from sexual abuse and harassment by their classmates, the Guardian has learned.

Full story: Guardian

Daily Mail

Tens of thousands of British children 'must go on statins (03/11/2017)

Tens of thousands of children should be put on statins to control inherited high cholesterol levels, according to the health watchdog. It wants youngsters to start taking the pills from the age of ten and continue them for the rest of their lives. NICE, the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence, is urging GPs to trawl their lists to identify children and adults suspected of having the condition based on their family history.

Full story: Daily Mail

Guardian

Emotional intelligence: why it matters and how to teach it (03/11/2017)

In our work with schools, it’s now commonplace for us to hear those in education talking about helping students (and staff) develop their emotional intelligence. But what do we mean exactly? Why and how should teachers support its development in their students? Emotional intelligence can be said to cover five main areas: self-awareness, emotional control, self-motivation, empathy and relationship skills. It is, of course, important for good communication with others – and is therefore a gateway to better learning, friendships, academic success and employment. Skills such as these developed in our formative years at school often provide the foundation for future habits later on in life.

Full story: Guardian

CEOP

Children at risk from ADHD diagnosis delays, experts warn (03/11/2017)

Slow, complicated delays in diagnosing attention deficit hyperactivity disorder are putting UK children at risk, a report has found. According to those surveyed, nearly a third of children waited two or more years to be diagnosed with ADHD. Most felt it wasn't recognised as a real condition by the GPs, school staff and specialists they encountered. The ADHD Foundation called for urgent change, saying the current system "fails thousands of children".

Full story: BBC

CYP Now

One in three children 'suffer from loneliness' (03/11/2017)

A third of children feel lonely and could be at risk of long-term mental and physical health problems, a charity has warned. A study by Action for Children into the impact of loneliness on children, young people and families included a poll of more than 500 children, which found that more than a third (39 per cent) had felt lonely in the past week. The charity has warned that sustained loneliness can have a life-long impact on children's mental and physical health, contributing to stress, depression, anxiety, paranoia and heart disease.

Full story: Children and Young People Now

CEOP

Childline: 'Privilege to have a child trust you to share their story' (03/11/2017)

"It's a way to give something back, to feel in that moment that you're making a difference, you're there to listen to children, you're there to help them." For Marnie, 27, giving up four hours a week to volunteer as a Childline counsellor is a privilege. She says knowing a child trusts her enough to tell her their story is overwhelming. Childline is urging more people across the UK to volunteer. While it has about 1,400 active volunteers, the charity says 400 more would mean they could answer nearly every child that makes contact.

Full story: BBC

Community Care

Growing proportion of social work assessments leading to no action, official statistics show (03/11/2017)

The proportion of initial social work assessments not leading to further action has hit its highest level in six years, government statistics show. Of those referrals that led to an assessment, 27.8% resulted in no further action, up 2.4 percentage points on the previous year, according to the ‘characteristics of children in need’ statistics. The figures, published this week, also showed the highest number of referrals to children’s services in three years, in the year ending 31 March 2017. The statistics also found that fewer referrals to children’s services resulted in no assessment at all. Only 10% of referrals resulted in no further action, a decrease of a third over the past six years.

Full story: Community Care

Community Care

Social workers should have ‘broad understanding’ of immigration system, says new guidance (02/11/2017)

Social workers are expected to have a “broad understanding” of the immigration system to help support unaccompanied asylum-seeking children (UASC) and child refugees, new statutory guidance has said. The guidance, published this week, also sets out the social work role in assessments, family reunification, accessing specialist asylum or immigration legal advice, and what parts of the asylum process social workers need to understand.

Full story: Community Care

Daily Mail

Teenage boy just 13 YEARS OLD says his devastating addiction to Black Mamba is 'tearing his family apart' (02/11/2017)

A 13-year-old boy has said his devastating addiction to 'zombie' drug Black Mamba is 'tearing his family apart'. Jamie Poulton, from Lincoln, became addicted to the synthetic form of cannabis known as 'Black Mamba' after struggling with his mental health. The teenager turned to the 'zombie drug' as a way of dealing with his mental health issues, including ADHD. He now smokes the highly addictive drug on a daily basis, sometimes until he passes out.

Full story: Daily Mail

Guardian

Drug use more likely than smoking among secondary school pupils (02/11/2017)

Secondary school children in England are now more likely to have tried drugs than cigarettes, according to a national survey. The statistics, from NHS Digital, found 24% of 11-15-year-olds saying they had tried recreational drugs at least once in their lives, a nine percentage point rise on the last survey, in 2014. The survey also found 19% of respondents saying they had smoked cigarettes at least once, a proportion roughly level with 2014 but well below the figure for 1996 when almost half of pupils questioned had tried smoking. And, in 2016, only 6% of pupils were classified as current smokers.

Full story: Guardian

Guardian

Child poverty in Britain set to soar to new record, says thinktank (02/11/2017)

The number of children living in poverty will soar to a record 5.2 million over the next five years as government welfare cuts bite deepest on households with young families, a leading UK thinktank has said. New research from the Institute for Fiscal Studies predicts an increase of more than a million in the number of children living in poverty, more than reversing all the progress made over the past 20 years.

Full story: Guardian

CEOP

Sexual violence in schools to be debated by MPs (02/11/2017)

MPs will debate sexual harassment and sexual violence in schools in the Commons later. It follows a report published last year which suggested sexual harassment among pupils had become normalised. The government has said it will support schools to develop codes of practice to combat harassment. In September 2015, a BBC investigation revealed there were 5,500 sexual offences recorded in UK schools between 2011 and 2014.

Full story: BBC

CYP Now

Munby calls for integration of youth and family courts (02/11/2017)

The highest-ranking family judge in England and Wales has called for a major shake-up of courts that hear cases involving children by amalgamating them into a single court that considers both criminal and welfare issues. In a speech to the Howard League for Penal Reform, Sir James Munby, president of the High Court's Family Division, said there is an urgent need to move towards "problem-solving" courts because current systems are not effective at ensuring the welfare of children, young people and families.

Full story: Children and Young People Now

CYP Now

Increase in number of children on protection plans (02/11/2017)

The number of children placed on protection plans is continuing to rise, government figures show. Statistics published by the Department for Education show that as of 31 March this year there were 51,080 children on child protection plans, an increase of 770, or 1.5 per cent, on the 50,310 recorded in 2016. The figure is now 30.64 per cent higher than in March 2010 - when it stood at 39,100. The number of referrals to children's services, defined as a request for services to be provided by children's social care and is in respect of a child who is not currently in need, also rose.

Full story: Children and Young People Now

CYP Now

Duke of Edinburgh's Award launches £3m drive to support disadvantaged children (02/11/2017)

The Duke of Edinburgh's Award is to spend £3m over the next four years to help an additional 20,000 disadvantaged young people a year access its youth programmes. The youth charity hopes to use the money to increase the number of disadvantaged young people it works with across the UK from almost 50,000 a year to 70,000 a year by 2021. The charity plans to achieve this by spending the money on preparing new organisations to run Duke of Edinburgh's Award programmes, equipment and transport for local groups, gifted participation places and training for award leaders.

Full story: Children and Young People Now

Community Care

Judgment limits cases social workers will have to take to court regarding detention of young people (02/11/2017)

Parents will be able to consent to the detention of children aged 16 and 17 who lack the capacity to consent themselves, following a Court of Appeal judgement that overturned the previous law. In a judgment handed down this week in the case of D (A Child), Sir James Munby said a 2016 Court of Protection ruling that a 16-year-old disabled boy was being deprived of his liberty under human rights law because his parents weren’t able to consent to his confinement in a residential placement was “wrong in law”. The 2016 judgment, by Mr Justice Keehan, had reasoned that consenting to the detention of a 16- or 17-year-old fell outside the scope of parental responsibility due to the “special status” 16- and 17-year-olds had in law.

Full story: Community Care

Daily Mail

Fewer children in homes where nobody works (01/11/2017)

The number of children living in families mired in poverty and endless benefits dependency has dropped by more than half a million in only six years, an official report said yesterday. It found that hundreds of thousands of parents who lived for years on state handouts have moved into jobs. As a result, the chance of children living in such families has fallen by a third. For the first time on record, fewer than one in ten children are living in a home where no-one works or has done so for a year, the analysis from the Office for National Statistics found.

Full story: Daily Mail

TES

Every teacher must be trained in mental health first aid, academy chain says (01/11/2017)

An academy chain is planning to train all its staff as mental health first-aiders. The E-Act multi-academy trust, which comprises 25 primary and secondary schools, will also be launching its own mental health curriculum, intended to ensure that all pupils understand the issues that may affect them. The trust’s chief executive, David Moran, has chosen to finance the scheme – which will cost £420,000 annually – from E-Act’s central coffers, because he believes that good mental health is vital if pupils are to be able to learn.

Full story: TES

CEOP

Hunt challenges social media giants on cyber-bullying (01/11/2017)

Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt is meeting social media giants, including Facebook and Twitter, to challenge them on cyber-bullying. In tweets ahead of the discussions, he says some responsibility for rising rates of youth self-harm lies with social platforms. He says the industry must be "part of the solution" regarding young people's mental health. Social media companies have said they do prioritise user safety.

Full story: BBC

CYP Now

Youth workers to deliver major mental health initiative in schools (01/11/2017)

Children's charity Action for Children is to pilot a mental health initiative that will see youth workers support young people in schools, with a view to introducing it across the UK next year. The charity said it is working with the Royal Mail to launch the Blues Programme, a preventative course designed for young people nearing the end of school who are showing early signs of anxiety, depression or other problems.

Full story: Children and Young People Now

Community Care

Four in ten children’s services unable to meet legal duties due to funding pressures, finds survey (31/10/2017)

Four in ten children’s services are unable to meet one or more of their statutory duties due to budget restraints, a survey of council leaders has revealed. The survey of local councillors responsible for children’s services, carried out by the National Children’s Bureau, found 35% felt their local authority lacked the resources to support children in need, while 41% felt unable to fulfil at least one of their statutory duties as a result of funding pressures. More than a third (35%) of councillors said there was insufficient funding to help children in care, while 30% said they lacked resources to support children with child protection plans.

Full story: Community Care

CEOP

The domestic violence victims 'left begging for a home' (31/10/2017)

Women fleeing domestic abuse have told the BBC's Victoria Derbyshire programme they are being left homeless because councils are failing to provide them with suitable temporary accommodation. "It was very difficult indeed, emotionally, because you're basically begging [for somewhere to stay], and every day not knowing where you're going to be sleeping," says Kay. "You're trying to put on a happy face to be supportive of the children - telling them, 'It's going to be all right,' when deep inside you really don't think it's going to be.

Full story: BBC

CYP Now

School-based charity reports rapid rise in safeguarding concerns (31/10/2017)

A school-based child and family support charity has reported a trebling in the proportion of cases it deals with over the last six years where there is a safeguarding concern. School Home Support (SHS), which deploys more than 60 support workers into schools across the south of England, said less support from councils and rising child protection thresholds have caused a rapid increase in the proportion of safeguarding cases it is involved with. In 2016/17 the proportion of safeguarding cases it was involved in was 17.3 per cent, more than treble the 5.6 per cent in 2010/11.

Full story: Children and Young People Now

CYP Now

Call for government to commit to early years strategy (31/10/2017)

The government should publish a strategy for early years family support services amid spending cutbacks and claims that parents are struggling to access decent provision. Research conducted by the Family and Childcare Trust (Fact), based on focus groups and surveys with more than 460 parents found that "many parents found it difficult to access good quality services". It also found that, while many parents found it easy to access local services, some reported that online information was not always up to date, and parents often reported that they had not used a service locally because they did not know it was available.

Full story: Children and Young People Now

CYP Now

Government urges councils to prioritise housing for domestic abuse victims (30/10/2017)

Councils will be "strongly encouraged" to prioritise social housing for children and parents who have fled domestic abuse under new guidance proposed by the government. The Department for Communities and Local Government said it wants councils to give victims of domestic abuse who are living in refuges and other types of safe temporary accommodation to be given as much assistance as possible to access social housing. The proposed statutory guidance will "strongly encourage" local authorities to waive residency requirements for access to social housing for people living in refuges or similar accommodation who have moved across council boundaries to escape domestic abuse.

Full story: Children and Young People Now