Guardian

British teenagers among world's most extreme internet users, report says (30/06/2017)

More than one in three British 15-year-olds are “extreme internet users” who spend at least six hours a day online – which is more than their counterparts in all the other 34 OECD countries apart from Chile, research has found. The report, by the Education Policy Institute (EPI) thinktank, says: “Over a third (37.3%) of UK 15-year-olds can be classed as ‘extreme internet users’ (6+ hours of use a day) – markedly higher than the average of OECD countries. “The only OECD country with higher levels of extreme internet use than the UK was Chile.” The OECD published its findings in a report last year on students wellbeing in its 35 member states.

Full story: Guardian

TES

Calls for DfE advice on lockdowns as more schools adopt the anti-terror measure (30/06/2017)

Teaching unions and security experts demand government guidance on school lockdowns in the event of a terrorist attack
Security experts and teaching unions are calling for the government to give schools information about how or whether they should practise lockdown procedures. Recent terror attacks at home and abroad have prompted a growing number of schools in England to introduce plans to lock teachers and pupils in classrooms to keep them safe in the event of a terrorist incident.

Full story: TES

CEOP

'Ban parents from leaving engines on', says guidance (30/06/2017)

Parents should be banned from leaving the car running while waiting outside school gates, to cut air pollution, according to official health guidance. The guidance also calls for councils to set up clean-air zones that could ban the most polluting vehicles or introduce charges. The authors have called for "clean air" to be given the same importance as "clean water". Air pollution contributes to 29,000 deaths each year in the UK. The report is by two government bodies - Public Health England (PHE) and the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE).

Full story: BBC

CEOP

Limiting time online 'won't protect children' (30/06/2017)

Limiting children's use of the internet will not protect them against the ills of social media, researchers say. UK teenagers have some of the highest rates of internet use in the developed world - something that has a strong link to lower levels of well-being. The Education Policy Institute study said restricting usage can prevent children gaining the digital skills and emotional resilience to keep them safe. The government said it was vital to help children deal with online risks.

Full story: BBC

Guardian

Police relax monitoring of sex offenders to focus on high-risk criminals (29/06/2017)

Police forces have dropped measures designed to stop convicted sex criminals reoffending, the National Police Chiefs’ Council has said, in a bid to focus more on those who present a greater risk. The new approach will see some low-risk offenders no longer being subject to annual home visits or having the risks they pose reassessed as thoroughly as before. Rapists may be included in the looser regime, as may those convicted while teenagers who are now adults with stable, law-abiding lives.

Full story: Guardian

Independent

Young offenders locked in cells for almost 24 hours and deprived of education, says report (29/06/2017)

Young offenders are being locked in their cells for almost entire days and deprived of education and activity, according to “deeply troubling” reports released today on the conditions in the Feltham young offenders prison. The London-based youth prison has seen a decline in standards, with key areas of safety and purposeful activity having “sunk to the lowest level” and conditions that are “quite simply, not safe for either staff or boys”, warned the Chief Inspector of Prisons Peter Clarke. Inspections of the two sections of the institution, Feltham A and Feltham B, note a “significant increase” in serious violence and a notable rise in the use of solitary confinement, which sees inmates eating every single meal alone in their cells.

Full story: Independent

Guardian

Councils call for say in schools funding to protect children with special needs (29/06/2017)

Children with special educational needs could lose out under government plans for a national funding formula for schools if there is no local input into education funding priorities, councils have warned. The Local Government Association (LGA), which represents more than 370 councils, says it supports the introduction of a revised formula to address unfairness in the school funding system. But it warns that setting budgets for England’s 22,000 schools from Whitehall “won’t work”, and calls on the government to allow local authorities a continuing role in local funding decisions in order to protect high needs children.

Full story: Guardian

CEOP

Rise in poorer students dropping out of university (29/06/2017)

Rising numbers of students from more disadvantaged homes are dropping out of universities in England before completing their studies, figures show. The proportion of youngsters from disadvantaged families who do not continue after their first year has reached the highest level for five years, says the Office for Fair Access. Official data shows that in 2014-15, 8.8% of young, full-time, disadvantaged undergraduates did not continue in higher education beyond their first year - up from 8.2% the year before. By comparison, in 2014-15, less than 5% of those from the wealthiest backgrounds did not continue their studies.

Full story: BBC

CYP Now

Warning over impact of academy expansion on school-based childcare (29/06/2017)

Expansion of the government's academy programme could undermine the sufficiency and quality of school-based childcare, the Family and Childcare Trust has said. The Trust's report, Academisation and Early Years Education, states that as the number of primary schools converting to academy status grows, the ability of local authorities and regional school commissioners (RSCs) to oversee standards and support settings that need to improve could be affected. It is also concerned that the introduction of different management arrangements as a result of schools converting to academies could limit the number of childcare places available at a time when demand is expected to grow to meet the expansion of free childcare.

Full story: Children and Young People Now

CYP Now

Call for police action on 'corrosive' stop and search practices (29/06/2017)

Action is needed to reform police stop and search practices which are alienating young people from black and minority ethnic (BAME) communities, a report has concluded. A study by the Criminal Justice Alliance (CJA) found that although the number of stop and searches carried out each year in England and Wales is in decline, the decline has disproportionately favoured white people. While the overall number of searches has dropped from a high of 1.2 million to a low of 380,000 in 2015/16, BAME people collectively are now three times more likely than white people to be searched, up from twice as likely the year before. Black people in particular are now six times as likely to be searched, up from four times the previous year.

Full story: Children and Young People Now

Daily Mail

Teenager was groomed and abused by 20 men he met online as police said they were 'powerless' to prevent him using the internet (29/06/2017)

A middle class teenager was groomed and sexually abused by at least 20 men as police were 'powerless' to stop his internet use. The boy – known only as Jack – had his mobile phone and laptop taken off him. His worried parents even switched off their router at home. But the tech-savvy teenager always found ways to get online, communicating with his abusers over social media sites. Now a serious case review has found that the 'intelligent and educated' boy was let down by police and social workers.

Full story: Daily Mail

NSPCC

Childline reports rise in contacts about race and faith-based bullying (28/06/2017)

Children as young as 9 are contacting Childline about race or faith-based bullying, according to our latest figures. It's not uncommon for Childline to see a spike in counselling sessions following some terror attacks. There have been more than 2,500 counselling sessions in the last 3 years about racial and faith-based bullying. Muslim, Jewish, Christian, Black and Sikh children were among those who have contacted Childline about the issue.

Full story: NSPCC

TES

'Equality for LGBT staff and pupils must not be a ‘nice to do if you have time’ issue for schools' (28/06/2017)

Schools desperately need to take a zero tolerance approach towards homophobic and transphobic bullying, writes one heads' leader. I was shocked to read the latest research from Stonewall, the organisation that campaigns for better rights for LGBT people, which says that nearly half of all students still face homophobic bullying. The figure is falling, so we are making progress. But it’s still way too high. Pupils who feel included, safe and happy will engage with learning and emerge as rounded and mentally healthy individuals. Staff who feel included, safe and happy will feel able to be authentic about their own identity. It’s clear that school leaders have a key role to play. As a head of a primary school, I set the culture of my school for teachers and for students. So when I looked at some of the data from Stonewall’s 2014 teacher’s report into homophobic bullying in schools, I was pretty appalled.

Full story: TES

CYP Now

Parliamentary group urges greater focus on maternal health to tackle childhood obesity (28/06/2017)

A group of MPs and peers have slammed government efforts to tackle childhood obesity and called for greater investment in health visiting services to support parents to address the issue pre-birth. A report on maternal obesity by the All Parliamentary Party Group (APPG) on Fit and Healthy Childhood says the government's 2016 childhood obesity strategy contains "vague statements" that are unfit to tackle the problem. In addition, it says the strategy saying nothing about the important role that maternal obesity plays in childhood obesity is a serious omission. Most recent figures from the National Child Measurement programme show that one in five 11-year-olds in England is obese.

Full story: Children and Young People Now

CYP Now

Goodwill takes on DfE early years and social care briefs (28/06/2017)

New Department for Education minister Robert Goodwill MP is to take on responsibility for early years in addition to children's social care as part of an expanded ministerial portfolio. Earlier this month, Goodwill, Conservative MP for Scarborough and Whitby, was handed the brief for vulnerable children and families previously held for nearly five years by Edward Timpson, who lost his Crewe and Nantwich seat by 48 votes at the general election. The former immigration and transport minister has now also been given responsibility for early years and childcare, a brief previously held by Caroline Dinenage in her role as under secretary of state for women, equalities and early years, before her move to the Department for Work and Pensions earlier this month.

Full story: Children and Young People Now