CEOP

Transgender pupils 'leaving schools over rights breaches' (22/09/2017)

A growing number of families are taking their transgender children out of schools because their rights are being breached, it is claimed. Some schools are causing pupils stress by not using the name they prefer or enforcing gendered uniform rules, the head of the Good Schools Guide says. This was leaving families with "no option but to pull transgender children out of a school", says Bernadette John.

Full story: BBC

TES

Funding formula poses 'real problems' for SEND pupils (22/09/2017)

Pupils with special educational needs and disabilities (SEND) face "real problems" as a result of the government's funding plans, a school finance expert is warning. Under the Department for Education's latest proposals, local authorities will be restricted in the amount of money they can transfer from the main schools budget to prop up funding for pupils with "high needs". High-needs funding is aimed at SEND pupils, and is under increasing pressure as budgets have been squeezed, the number of conditions being diagnosed has increased, and more children survive serious health conditions that cause developmental delays.

Full story: TES

CYP Now

Major youth work charities announce merger (22/09/2017)

Youth work organisations UK Youth and Ambition have merged, it has been announced. As part of a deal rubberstamped last month, Ambition has became a subsidiary of UK Youth in a move that the two charities said will strengthen the voice and quality of the youth work sector. Anna Smee, chief executive of UK Youth, told CYP Now that talks between the two organisations have been happening on and off since the 1940s but the time is now right to make the move.

Full story: Children and Young People Now

CYP Now

Councils demand action to protect young people in custody (22/09/2017)

Local councils are pressing the government to take action to make youth custody safer. The Local Government Association (LGA) has issued the call in response to a report by HM Inspectorate of Prisons published in July that revealed how rates of self-harm and assault within youth custody have soared in the past five years. In that report Peter Clarke, the chief inspector of prisons, warned that the dangers are such that a tragedy is ‘inevitable' unless action is taken fast.

Full story: Children and Young People Now

Guardian

Common ear infections don't need antibiotics, health watchdog says (22/09/2017)

Children with common ear infections should not be given antibiotics, a health watchdog has said. New draft guidance from the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (Nice) says parents should treat the infections with paracetamol or ibuprofen instead. It comes a few days after the US Centres for Disease Control and Prevention also warned parents that antibiotics are not suitable for many common conditions

Full story: Guardian

TES

Girls aged 7 feel pressure to conform to gender roles at school (21/09/2017)

Girls face relentless pressure from gender stereotypes on a daily basis, affecting how much they participate in class, how much exercise they do and how they behave with their peers. Even girls as young as 7 say that the constant barrage of gender stereotypes affects their ability to say what they think. A survey of more than 1,900 girls and young women between the ages of 7 and 21, conducted by the charity Girlguiding, reveals that pressure from social media, TV, newspapers, friends, teachers and parents all affect how they think and act.

Full story: TES

Community Care

Should written agreements still be a common part of child protection practice? (21/09/2017)

‘Draconian’; ‘unsafe’; ‘knee jerk reaction’; ‘shoddy practice’. These are just some of the criticisms of written agreements made by social workers who responded to a Community Care survey in June. Concerns over social workers’ use of written agreements in child protection cases – often where domestic abuse is a factor – have been evident in recent months in serious case reviews, and were raised again in a recent thematic report by inspectors. And now Community Care’s survey has also found misgivings about these agreements, while highlighting some of their benefits if used with care.

Full story: Community Care

Racism label should not deter British police from FGM fight, says officer (21/09/2017)

Claims of racism over female genital mutilation (FGM) investigations should not be allowed to disrupt a police initiative targeting families coming into the UK from countries where the practice is prevalent, one of the officers leading the project has said. Insp Allen Davis of the Metropolitan police’s child abuse and sexual offences command is part of Operation Limelight, a team of about 30 police officers, Border Force officials and social workers who meet flights coming in from countries where children might have been taken for FGM over the summer holidays. Among others they focus on flights coming into the UK from Egypt, Nigeria and other African countries including Ethiopia.

Full story:

Guardian

Primary school teachers 'not trained to deal with mental health issues' (21/09/2017)

More than half of primary school teachers say they do not feel adequately trained in supporting pupils with mental health problems, research suggests. Just one in 10 “strongly agreed” with the statement that they felt they had the necessary training to feel confident about what action to take when a child was experiencing a mental health problem, compared with 54% who disagreed. About four in 10 who took part in the YouGov poll said they were not confident they knew which organisations to approach to help a pupil with mental health issues.

Full story: Guardian

TES

'I have a volcano inside of me': film helps children talk about mental health (20/09/2017)

“What can you do when small feelings are bothering you?” This is the question asked in a new animated film, co-created by teachers and pupils, which aims to help children cope with mental health problems. The six-minute film was produced by the Anna Freud National Centre for Children and Families, and features an introduction from the Duchess of Cambridge.

Full story: TES

Daily Mail

Shocking figures show teenagers are struggling to cope with school, stress and pressures of social media (20/09/2017)

Nearly one in four teenage girls suffers from depression as they struggle to cope with the pressures of life, say researchers. Analysis shows that 24 per cent of 14-year-old girls and 9 per cent of boys that age were found to be depressed. Data collected by the Millennium Cohort Study on more than 10,000 children born in the year 2000-01 was used by University College London and Liverpool University. When the children were aged three, five, seven, 11 and 14, their parents were questioned about their child’s mental health and general behaviour.

Full story: Daily Mail

Independent

There is a way to prevent so many teenage girls being depressed – but no one wants to admit it (20/09/2017)

Even if it were possible, there is nothing on earth that would make me want to go back to being a teenage girl. My early twenties? Possibly. My thirties? Definitely. Anything under the age of 17? Frankly, I’d rather be fast-tracked into old age. Being a teenage girl is hard, by which I don’t mean your hormones render you an irrational, weeping mess. I mean the world can start to crush you, just at the point when you’re trying to grow. What’s more, it’s a problem that seems to be getting worse.

Full story: Independent

CYP Now

Call for overhaul of 'perverse' apprenticeships funding system (20/09/2017)

Training providers are calling for an overhaul of the government's apprenticeship programme to prevent young people being frozen out of placements. The Association of Employment and Learning Providers (AELP) said current funding arrangements offer "a perverse set of incentives", which encourage employers to focus programmes on adult and management-level placements rather than offering entry-level opportunities to young people.

Full story: Children and Young People Now

CYP Now

Flagship early intervention programme set for further expansion (20/09/2017)

A Department for Education-backed early intervention project is set for expansion after receiving a funding boost from lottery funding. The Pause project, which aims to break the cycle of repeat pregnancies among women who have already had a child taken into care, is already running in 15 council areas across England, with two more practices set to open in Blackpool and St Helens by the end of the year. But after receiving £1.5m from the Big Lottery Fund it will look to expand into Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland.

Full story: Children and Young People Now

TES

Mental health: one in four 14-year-old girls is depressed (20/09/2017)

One in four schoolgirls is depressed by the age of 14, new research has shown. And one in 10 boys is depressed at the same age. Researchers from the UCL Institute of Education and the University of Liverpool analysed information on the mental health of more than 10,000 children born between 2000 and 2001. They found that, based on the teenagers’ reporting of their emotional problems, 24 per cent of girls and 9 per cent of boys suffered from depression by the time they were 14 years old.

Full story: TES